Author Topic: Common Chemicals Affecting Your Fertility  (Read 705 times)

Offline Farhana Israt Jahan

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Common Chemicals Affecting Your Fertility
« on: November 17, 2012, 11:24:04 AM »
Common Chemicals Affecting Your Fertility

Many couples try month after month to become pregnant, and new research suggests that for some, the delay may be related to their exposure to chemicals found in the soil, water, and food supply.

These chemicals, called persistent organochlorine pollutants, may persist in the environment for decades. Some, such as persistent lipophilic organochlorine pollutants, accumulate in fatty tissues in animals, while perfluorochemicals or PFCs are used in clothing, furniture, adhesives, food packaging, nonstick cooking surfaces, and electrical wire insulation.

The new study shows that men and women with high levels of these chemicals in their blood took longer to conceive than couples with lower levels. The effects seem to be more pronounced in men.

(http://www.emedicinehealth.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=165096
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD on Nov. 14, 2012)
Farhana Israt Jahan
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Pharmacy

Offline sharifa

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Re: Common Chemicals Affecting Your Fertility
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2012, 02:41:30 PM »
Mam, Thanks for sharing.
Sharifa Sultana
Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacy,
Faculty of Allied Health Sciences,
Daffodil International University

Offline Farhana Israt Jahan

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Re: Common Chemicals Affecting Your Fertility
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2013, 02:30:09 PM »
Thanks Sharifa madam for encouraging me..
Farhana Israt Jahan
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Pharmacy

Offline skaka

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Re: Common Chemicals Affecting Your Fertility
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2013, 02:24:57 PM »
Toxic element in the soil have serious difficulty encountered in attempts to relate trace-elements to plant response is the fact that their concentration in the agricultural zone varies in time and space. Thus, to study trace-elements concentration in an agricultural field it is useful to use a large number of samples, or at least to have a representative sampling grid of the experimental field.