Author Topic: Early security problems: moths and Cap’n Crunch  (Read 480 times)

Offline sagar.swe

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Early security problems: moths and Cap’n Crunch
« on: July 09, 2015, 08:57:31 PM »
One of the first recorded computer security threats actually didn’t come from a human. In 1945, Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper found a moth among the relays of a Navy computer and called it a “bug.” From this, the term “debugging” was born. It wasn’t until the 1960s that humans started exploiting networks. From 1964 to 1970, AT&T caught hundreds of people obtaining free phone calls through the use of tone-producing “blue boxes.” Later in the 1970s, John Draper found another way to make free phone calls by using a blue box and plastic toy whistle that came in Cap’n Crunch cereal boxes. The two items combined to replicate a tone unlocking AT&T’s phone network.
Md Alamgir Kabir
Lecturer
Department of Software Engineering

Offline maruf.swe

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Re: Early security problems: moths and Cap’n Crunch
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2018, 08:08:20 PM »
Informative Post. Thank you.