Roger Federer’s Loss at Wimbledon Is Disappointing, but Not Devastating

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Offline asitrony

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WIMBLEDON, England — Just as Roger Federer was handed the one object he did not want to touch — the Wimbledon runner-up trophy — his wife, Mirka, held up her cellphone from her seat in the family box, capturing the presentation.

Of all the tennis moments that the Federers have experienced, this was not among the best. Still, there was something worth commemorating Sunday. After all, it took Novak Djokovic, the world’s No. 1 player, to beat Federer.
“I still think I had a great tournament,” Federer said after his 7-6 (1), 6-7 (10), 6-4, 6-3 loss in the final. “You can have good tournaments without winning as well at the end. I still won six matches and lost one. The ratio still remains very good.

“But of course, you sort of walk away empty-handed.”
At 33, an age by which some of his contemporaries have resorted to coaching or broadcasting, Federer is still ranked No. 2, and he played like No. 1.5 in this tournament. He served brilliantly (especially in the semifinals, against Andy Murray), moved with his usual grace, flashed some of his signature backhands and imposed his presence at the net.

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