Author Topic: Growing up with my child  (Read 2213 times)

Offline nusrat-diu

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Growing up with my child
« on: February 09, 2011, 03:50:34 PM »
My 10-month old baby is now passing her babbling stage. For two days, she's uttering 'bi-bi-bi-bi-bi' as if she's memorizing English alphabet B  :)
It's really wonderful to see her growing up everyday in front of my eyes. She means a lot to me! I often wonder..how Allah creates such a liitle baby and put all the emotions in her! She cries, she smiles, stares at TV Commercials, dances with music  and so on...  Her birth is a new beginning in my life and sometimes I think I'm also growing up with her.

Here I would like to invite all the parent teachers to share their feelings about babies.
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: Growing up with my child
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2011, 06:50:05 PM »
May be parent-teachers are passing very busy days. That's why they are not responding. Hope they will start writing soon.
Nusrat Jahan
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Department of English
Daffodil International University

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Re: Growing up with my child
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2011, 03:41:00 PM »
My baby is passing her 11th month. I'm always curious about her growing. Now I'm going to share an article I went through today. Hope the writing will be helpful for all the 1-year olds' parents.

Wow! Your Baby is 1 Year Old!
By Jill Tomlin
Take time to pull out the photo albums and review the miraculous changes you've witnessed in your baby this past year. Incredible! Most important, revel in all baby can do as she celebrates her first year. Baby has a delightful sense of humor, and she takes great pleasure in teasing you. She loves to express affection, and she most likely has mastered the art of hugging and kissing. What a great year it's been -- and what an amazing adventure your family has ahead.

Milestones of 12 months*
•Your baby now drinks from a cup without assistance.


•She can stand alone for several minutes.


•Baby walks well (keep in mind that good crawlers often are late walkers).


•She waves good-bye and plays pat-a-cake.


•Baby says "mama" and "dada."


•She says other one-syllable words (like "hi").


•Baby expresses her wants with gestures and words instead of cries.


•She engages in gibberish conversation.


•Baby responds to simple commands.
*All babies have their own internal developmental timetable. If your 11-month-old hasn't yet reached these milestones, rest assured that she will in time. If you have concerns about your baby's development, discuss them with her doctor.
Nusrat Jahan
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Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: Growing up with my child
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2011, 02:06:06 PM »
Your child's birthday is an important event, but you need to keep several points in mind when planning a celebration.

Your child's first birthday is a monumental event, at least in the eyes of you and your spouse. The first year has probably gone by so quickly, and your baby has reached so many milestones, that it is really hard to believe that not long ago she was a small, helpless newborn. Now your child is busily exploring and searching for new adventures from the time she awakens until the time she goes to sleep.

Obviously, you want to mark this wonderful occasion with a special celebration to honor your little one. You need to keep several points in mind, however, when you begin planning your baby's birthday party.


The general rule to determine how many children to invite to a child's birthday party is to stick to the number that represents the age of the child. Well, that might be difficult to do with a one or two year old, but the point is that you don't want to have so many children at the party that it is too overwhelming for them and for the birthday honoree.


Actually, your baby's first birthday may be one of the easiest celebrations that you plan for him. After all, he really won't remember much, if any, of it, and he's not old enough to tell you what he wants as a theme or as a present. You get to make all the decisions, and you get to decide on the guest list.


It's perfectly all right for the guest list to include several children as long as their parents come, too. At a first birthday, you may have more adults than children because grandparents, aunts and uncles may attend. You should invite as many people as you like and have room for. Keep in mind, though, that too much stimulation can make your baby tired and cranky.


It is important to take into consideration the time of day when you are planning the party. You want to work around naptimes. In fact, it is a good idea if you can schedule the party so that it occurs immediately after your child has taken a nap and had something to eat. This is when she should be at her most pleasant, and she will be rested and ready for fun. Be sure and feed her a good, nutritious meal, so she can be ready to dive into her cake.


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You might want to consider buying two cakes. Once cake can be all baby's, and she will have a ball grabbing handfuls of cake and icing and attempting to stuff them into her mouth. The other cake can be for your guests. It is perfectly all right to have finger foods, but you need to use caution if there are small children present. You might want to forgo the nuts for pieces of fruit that are cut small enough to keep young ones from choking. Crackers are another excellent snack for almost all ages. You might even want to order or make a pizza. Even babies can munch on a pizza crust. Don't forget the ice cream!


It is equally important to use caution in your decorating scheme. Decorating can be easy because there are so many themes available. You might want to do a theme to match your child's nursery or her favorite storybook character. If you use balloons, though, be sure to keep them tied out of the way of little hands. A deflated or burst balloon can be a serious choking hazard to little ones. You may only want to use streamers, instead.


Be sure to have someone video tape the party. You'll probably have your hands full with your baby, so ask someone else to be the movie maker. You also want to take a variety of pictures. If you own a digital camera, you don't have to worry about how many pictures are taken. You can just delete the pictures that you don't like. You might even hand disposable cameras to some of the other party-goers and ask them to snap away. They might capture a precious moment that you may have missed.








You don't have to stick to photographic memories, though. Why not place a pretty basket on the table with different colored paper beside it? Ask your guests to write something about your little one. They might share a memory of when she was born, when they first saw her, or what her personality is like. You could put the notes away to save for her.


Finally, don't plan on the party lasting for very long. You'll probably only want to entertain for an hour to an hour in a half, at the most. Your baby will tire pretty quickly with all of the excitement that is going on. Don't be surprised if her favorite toy is an empty box or a wad of wrapping paper! Once everyone has gone home, take some time to snuggle with your little one. Remember, the next year will fly by just as quickly!

(Source: essortment)















Nusrat Jahan
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Daffodil International University

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Re: Growing up with my child
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2011, 02:45:08 PM »
My angel Aleeza is now passing her 15 months by the grace of Almighty Allah!

She can sing a song (o...o..o..o..), dance with music...and so on..

Yesterday all day long she asked 'ki'.

Here I would like to share an article:

Your 15-month-old's language and cognitive development: Speaking volumes
by Dana Sullivan


New this month: Speaking volumes
By 15 months, the majority (about 75 percent) of children have a vocabulary that consists of "Mama" and "Dada" plus at least three other words, usually nouns, such as "cookie," "ball," and "dog." "More," and of course the all-time toddler favorite, "No!" are also common early words. A typical 15-month-old can also follow simple commands, such as "Bring me your shoes," or "Put the book down." She also understands the meanings of phrases such as "No," "Come here," "Show me," and "Look."

What you can do
One of the best ways you can encourage your chatterbox to keep on talking is to listen. Even if you don't understand all of what she's saying or asking, make eye contact when she's trying to communicate with you, and acknowledge or respond to her comments and questions whenever possible, which will motivate her to keep on trying.

If your child is taking her time learning to talk, spend a lot of time together reading. Even looking at picture books and pointing out familiar objects will help her store the information for future use. Try to avoid using baby talk, since it can be confusing. If your little one says "goggy" rather than doggy, simply say, "Yes, that's a doggy," rather than repeating her version of the word.

Up until now your child may have had difficulty sitting still to look at books, unless it was just before bedtime. But starting at about 15 months, children become interested in looking at picture books, either with Mom or Dad or alone. You may see your toddler pat the pictures in books, and books with different textures, like the classic Pat the Bunny, are often favorites at this age. And your toddler doesn't have to be sitting in your lap to enjoy a story; you can read to her while she's playing on the floor, too.

Other developments: Using tools and imaginary play
A 12- or 13-month-old will finger and then chew on a spoon or use it to bang on the floor or a pan. But a 15-month-old understands that a spoon is for stirring or eating and will try to use it for its intended purpose, stirring her oatmeal at mealtime. Rather than just drag a broom behind her, she'll try to sweep the floor with it. And when you hand your toddler a hairbrush, she'll attempt to brush her own hair, or a doll's or stuffed animal's. Understanding how objects are used correlates with a child's ability to both use words and express ideas. She is starting to be able to think ahead about how things work, and what the result of her actions will be.

By playing out a familiar scenario, such as mealtime, you will encourage your toddler to use her imagination. Let your child be the chef, and give her a plastic mixing bowl, a manual eggbeater, spoon, and strainer. When she's finished "cooking" something yummy for you, have her help you set a pretend table so you can enjoy a pretend meal together.

As soon as children begin to use language — that is, they both understand words and start to use them — they also have the ability to pretend. Most of your 15-month-old's imaginative play will revolve around her own behaviors. She'll pick up a spoon and pretend to eat from it. Or she'll put her head on your lap and feign sleep. She's using symbols to express her ideas, but at this stage, "pretending" closely mirrors real behavior. In the coming months and years you'll notice your child making leaps in her ability to think outside reality. She'll pick up a stick and wave it before you, saying it's an airplane flying in the clouds, or pretend to be something that she isn't, such as a firefighter.

While it may not be until after her second birthday that your child can actually pretend to be someone else, you can still experiment with role-play. For instance, you pretend to be a dog and suggest that your toddler is a cat. You bark, she meows, and you both have a great laugh. For even more fun, she pretends to be a big dog and you pretend to be a little kitten. Children derive a lot of satisfaction and confidence from this sort of role-reversal, where they get to be the big strong one for a change and an adult plays small and helpless.


« Last Edit: June 30, 2011, 02:46:55 PM by nusrat-diu »
Nusrat Jahan
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Daffodil International University

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Re: Growing up with my child
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2011, 04:50:45 PM »

What Fourteen-Month-Old Babies Can Do
The following are typical tasks that most fourteen-month-olds can perform. Remember that all babies develop at different rates. Most toddlers of this age will take some steps without help. Also they may walk with help. Babies of this age group might also be able to empty containers of their contents. Many also can say a few words other than "mama" or "dada."

Some babies may be able to do more – showing an ability to toddle well, pointing to a named body part when asked and using words with gestures to communicate needs.

The most advanced children at the age may be able to do these things:

Nusrat Jahan
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Daffodil International University

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Re: Growing up with my child
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2011, 04:52:14 PM »

Babies' Development at Fifteen Months
At the age of fifteen months the average baby can say about five words and may also laugh at funny things. Again, bear in mind that being a bit ahead or behind is no cause for alarm.

Some babies will also be able to walk well or even run in some cases, draw lines, say "no" and shake their heads appropriately and follow simple directions.

Babies relatively far ahead of the average may possibly be able to:

•Walk upstairs.
•Have a desire to help around the house.
•Experience less anxiety about separation.
•Respond well to verbal requests without other signals.


Nusrat Jahan
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Department of English
Daffodil International University

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Re: Growing up with my child
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2011, 04:53:11 PM »

What Sixteen-Month-Old Babies Can Do

At sixteen months a child may become upset when frustrated. He or she may also become very attached to certain toys. A toddler may also turn pages as a parent reads.

Toddlers who are somewhat ahead of the average may be able to walk backward, become interested and able to climb and explore, help with simple tasks around the home and can say about ten to 20 words.

Those who are even more advanced may be able to do the things below:

•Be picky with food.
•Take off articles of clothing unaided.
•Dance.
•Prance and trot around.


Nusrat Jahan
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Daffodil International University

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Re: Growing up with my child
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2011, 04:53:54 PM »

Milestones for Toddlers at Seventeen Months
A seventeen-month-old toddler is likely to climb and explore. Some may also begin to show interest in games and can respond to simple commands. Remember, some may not have reached these milestones yet while others may have gone beyond them already.

Some seventeen-month-olds can do more – saying ten to fifteen words, being finicky about certain foods, running well and using some words on a regular basis.

The most advanced may:

•Be able to kick a ball forward.
•String words together into phrases or pairs.
•Brush teeth with help.


Nusrat Jahan
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Daffodil International University

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Re: Growing up with my child
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2011, 04:54:51 PM »

Development of Eighteen-Month-Old Toddlers
Eighteen-month-old children will probably be able to draw or scribble. They may also get picky about food. Their vocabulary will be about fifteen to twenty words and they may be capable of self-feeding with a spoon.

Other eighteen-month-olds may also be able to make phrases or word pairs, brush teeth with help and remove clothes.

Some children these age can do even more things, such as:

•Taking toys apart and sometimes put them back together.
•Showing signs of potty training.
•Climbing out of the high chair or crib.
•Take clothing off.
•Drawing circles
Every child develops at his own pace. Some will be faster, others slower. This is just a general guide on the milestones likely to be achieved by toddlers from thirteen to eighteen months old. If parents are indeed concerned about their child's development, talking the the child's doctor is advisable.



Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University