Author Topic: Foods for Babies  (Read 6640 times)

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Foods for Babies
« on: March 22, 2011, 04:48:31 PM »
In the early stages of life, babies feed primarily on breast milk. During this time, all the nutrients required by them are covered by breast milk, which acts like a tonic, satisfying their appetite as well as protecting them from susceptible dangers of many diseases. However, once babies start growing, their nutritional requirements also start growing. The body of the child needs more nutrition to grow. Thus, the diet of the baby has to be rich, providing him complete nutrition. There are some specific foods which should be included and some that should be avoided, once the baby turns a year old. For your convenience, given below is a list of baby foods for 1 year olds.
 
Diet for One Year Old

You can replace breast milk or formula milk with whole milk, after the child is one year old. However, do not resort to low fat or skim milk. It is not good for children, as they need fat for growth.

Give your child fruits, vegetables and breads to ensure that he/she gets all nutrients.

Grains and dairy products should also form a part of the diet of your one year old child.

Feed your child 4 - 5 times a day, because toddlers cannot eat too much at one time.

In case of new foods in the diet of the baby, add only one at a time and keep a check for any allergic reactions.

Avoid foods such as nuts, popcorn, potato chips, corn, grapes, raisins, etc. These foods may choke the baby.
 
Do not give sweets or sweetened beverages to the baby, as they contribute to tooth decay.

Do not give soft drinks, coffee, tea, and chocolate.

Do not give any vitamin supplements to the baby, as a healthy child should get all its nutrient content from foods. Standard pediatric multi-vitamins may be given, if your pediatrician recommends it.

Do not feed the baby solids in a bottle.

Avoid giving milk or fruit juice in a bottle to the baby while he is lying in bed. This can develop nursing bottle mouth, which may result in tooth decay.

Source: Lifestyle Lounge
« Last Edit: March 22, 2011, 04:50:44 PM by nusrat-diu »
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2011, 06:05:40 PM »
Eggs are one of the top 8 of all allergens. It is the white of the egg that is allergenic and not the yolk. Many pediatricians will say that egg yolks are typically fine to be introduced to baby around 8 months old; this recommendation is changing however.  It is very rare for anyone to be allergic to the yolk of an egg.

 

The egg whites on the other hand, contain 4 proteins that can range from mildly to highly allergenic. Most pediatricians say that egg whites/whole eggs should not be fed to baby before 1 year of age.

 
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2011, 06:10:49 PM »
Eggs, particularly the yolk are rich in choline needed for brain development as well as vitamin D, protein, and some eggs contain DHA. There is no reason for your child not to have 1-2 eggs a day.

http://www.westonaprice.org/children/nou…
Egg yolks, rich in choline, cholesterol and other brain-nourishing substances, can be added to your baby's diet as early as four months,1 as long as baby takes it easily. (If baby reacts poorly to egg yolk at that age, discontinue and try again one month later.) Cholesterol is vital for the insulation of the nerves in the brain and the entire central nervous system. It helps with fat digestion by increasing the formation of bile acids and is necessary for the production of many hormones. Since the brain is so dependent on cholesterol, it is especially vital during this time when brain growth is in hyper-speed.25 Choline is another critical nutrient for brain development. The traditional practice of feeding egg yolks early is confirmed by current research. A study published in the June 2002 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition compared the nutritional effects of feeding weaning infants 6-12 months of age regular egg yolks, enriched egg yolks, and an otherwise normal diet. The researchers found that both breastfed and formula-fed infants who consumed the egg yolks had improved iron levels when compared with the infants who did not. In addition, those infants who got the egg yolks enriched with extra fatty acids had 30 percent to 40 percent greater DHA levels than those fed regular egg yolks. No significant effect on blood cholesterol levels was seen.26

Thus, the best choice for baby is yolks from pasture-fed hens raised on flax meal, fish meal, or insects since they will contain higher levels of DHA. Why just the yolk? The white is the portion that most often causes allergic reactions, so wait to give egg whites until after your child turns one.1,11

Don't neglect to put a pinch of salt on the egg yolk. While many books warn against giving salt to babies, salt is actually critical for digestion as well as for brain development. Use unrefined salt to supply a variety of trace minerals.

http://www.westonaprice.org/children/nou…

Don't Fear Fats!

Pediatric clinicians have known for some time that children fed low-fat and low-cholesterol diets fail to grow properly. After all, a majority of mother's milk is fat, much of it saturated fat. Children need high levels of fat throughout growth and development. Milk and animal fats give energy and also help children build muscle and bone.1 In addition, the animal fats provide vitamins A and D necessary for protein and mineral assimilation, normal growth and hormone production.27

Choose a variety of foods so your child gets a range of fats, but emphasize stable saturated fats, found in butter, meat and coconut oil, and monounsaturated fats, found in avocados and olive oil.
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2011, 02:40:52 PM »
6 Good Foods for Baby Brain
 
The intelligence of baby is generally influenced by the type of food that she consumed each day. The foods that she consumed will play important role to improve the ability of baby’s brain. Here are some foods that are known as good foods for baby brain:

•Eggs
Eggs are rich in protein, zinc, vitamin A (it is very good for baby’s vision), vitamin D (good for bone growth), vitamin E (to prevent disease), and vitamin B12 (to form red blood cells). Egg yolk contains lecithin which is considered important as brain food. Lecithin is good for memory and concentration because it contains iron that is important for brain function

•Kiwi
Vitamin C that is contained in Kiwi is two times more than in oranges. Vitamin C is crucial in early stages of baby’s brain development. Vitamin C creates neurotransmitters, allowing the brain to transmit information from one neuron to another. Vitamin C is also needed to synthesize the neurotransmitter norepinephrine, which is known to affect mood and attention.

Besides, vitamin C is also important to absorb iron from the diet. Iron is very beneficial for baby’s development brain. It is because of iron aid the oxygen supply to blood and in fact that brain uses approximately 20% of the blood oxygen. So, iron is directly related to the brain function and health. Because vitamin C can’t be stored in the body, then the children need to eat foods that rich in vitamin C, such as kiwi, broccoli, and others.

•Bananas
Bananas are a good source of carbohydrates with good energy content. Consumption of banana fruit as a snack will help to increase baby’s concentration. Banana is a fruit that is important as brain builder fruit. Bananas could also improve the brain function. Bananas is rich in potassium which was according to researches is very useful to assist babies in learning by making pupils more alert. Potassium that is contained in bananas is a vital mineral that sends oxygen to the brain.
•Fish oil
Several types of fatty acids are not made in the body and must be obtained from food. Fat becomes the main component of the brain. Please note, main component of the brain composed of fatty acids which play an important role in brain cells function. I’m sure that you have known about it, right?
•Oatmeal
Oatmeal is one of the most popular types of cereals and rich in essential nutrients for the brain. Oatmeal can provide the energy for brain. Oatmeal is also a source of vitamin E, vitamin B, potassium, and zinc that can make the body and brain function optimally. The content of vitamin E in 250 grams of oatmeal is 0.08 mg. The content of vitamin B is 0.26 mg per 250 grams of oatmeal and zinc 6.19 mg per 250 grams of oatmeal.
•Milk and yoghurt
Foods derived from dairy products is high in protein and vitamin B. Two types of nutrients that essential for the growth of brain tissue are neurotransmitters, and enzymes. Milk and yogurt also contain protein and carbohydrate as a good source of energy for the brain.
Source: babytipz.com
« Last Edit: March 30, 2011, 02:48:56 PM by nusrat-diu »
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2011, 06:12:28 PM »
Diarrhea in infants can be a very worrisome occurrence as most parents fear dehydration and the worsening of painful diaper rash. When baby has diarrhea, many parents wonder what foods may help "bind" baby up and stop the diarrhea.

What are the possible cause of diarrhea in babies?
Children can have acute and chronic forms of diarrhea. Infection with the rotavirus is the most common cause of acute childhood diarrhea. Rotavirus diarrhea usually resolves itself within 3 to 10 days. Children who are 6 to 32 weeks old can be vaccinated against the rotavirus with a vaccine called Rotateq. Here are a few of the common causes of diarrhea:

food sensitivities | bacteria | viruses | parasites | medications | functional bowel disorders

 If your child has diarrhea, do not hesitate to call the doctor for advice. Diarrhea is especially dangerous in newborns and infants, leading to dehydration in just a day or two. A child can die from dehydration within a few days. The main treatment for diarrhea in children is rehydration to replace lost fluid quickly.

What foods should you feed a baby when he has diarrhea? What foods should you avoid when baby has diarrhea?
Please offer your baby small meals when he has diarrhea. Offering smaller meals will allow baby's digestive system to work slowly. The tiny intestines and still fragile digestive system will take a bit of time to get back on track and healed. Don't worry if it takes 3 to 4 days for your baby's stools to get back to "normal"; healing takes time.

B.R.A.T - When baby has diarrhea, remember B.R.A.T.
Bananas - Rice - Applesauce - Toast
The foods that make up the B.R.A.T diet are those foods that will help cause the bulking and hardening of the stool. These foods include grains, and certain fruits. Below are more foods that will help firm-up and bind baby's stools when diarrhea occurs.

Bananas
Rice and/or Homemade Rice Cereal
Breads - specifically toasted breads
Pastas
White potato
Yogurt
applesauce




Foods to Avoid with Infant Diarrhea
Avoid any foods that are used to help alleviate constipation and certain fruits as well. Below is a list of foods to avoid when baby has diarrhea:

all dairy products (yogurt is the exception due to its helpful bacteria - consult your baby's pediatrician about feeding yogurt with diarrhea)
Fruits that begin with the letter "P" such as peaches, pears, prunes, and plums
apricots and other "Stone" fruits are typically known to help loosen stools so avoid those fruits as well
High Fiber foods

Applesauce vs. Diluted Apple Juice
As we mentioned about Infant Constipation, please keep in mind that Applesauce is actually a binding food. Applesauce is the whole of the fruit. It contains a higher level of pectin - which firms up stools and may thus lead to constipation.

Apple juice contains more of the sugars found in the apple and it also contains more actual liquid; hence apple juice is a good remedy to help relieve constipation.
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2011, 03:46:02 PM »
                                                      Breastfeeding: Nature's Perfect Baby Food
                                                                      Deepak Chopra
                                                               www.huffingtonpost.com 

                                                               
The moment a mother delivers a new person into the world, her next amazing feat begins: producing and delivering the perfect food for that baby.

Hormonal changes at delivery trigger the lactation process. Breast milk is the ideal combination of protein, fat, immunity boosting factors and key nutrients to help a baby's body and brain grow strong. The act of nursing also seems to lower mothers' risk of breast and ovarian cancer. For the most part, breastfeeding requires just mom, baby and a comfortable chair or bed. No dishes, no groceries, no bottles! However, this natural process is not without its rough spots. Nipple soreness, anxiety and exhaustion strike most nursing moms at some point. The most important advice to new moms: Don't give up. Make sure to line up expert help from maternity nurses or a lactation consultant.

A summary of some common challenges during breastfeeding, along with solutions and tips can be found below. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends nursing a newborn exclusively for at least six months and preferably continuing, after the baby begins eating solid foods, for a full year or more. Nearly every mom and baby can do it. They just have to learn to dance together.

Breastfeeding Obstacles

Mom and baby just can't get comfortable.

Closeness is key. Whether you cradle the baby, hold her football-style at your side or let her lie beside you, bring her face close to your breast so she can latch on securely. Don't strain your back by leaning forward.

The baby is not gaining weight.

It is common for babies to lose a little weight after birth, then settle into a pattern of gaining a pound a month or more. Consult your pediatrician. If your baby has six to eight very wet diapers a day, and is nursing at least every two or three hours, there is likely no cause for alarm.

The mother's breasts are heavy and sore.

Engorgement is the signal to feed the baby. If your breasts remain engorged between feedings, try pumping the milk and freezing it to alleviate soreness.

The mother feels she has too little milk.

Nursing is a positive feedback system. Breastfeeding signals the brain that the body needs to keep up the baby's food supply. When mothers stop nursing for a bit out of frustration or exhaustion, the body reads it as a sign that baby has had enough, and cuts production. Try to keep breastfeeding or pumping milk even when the going gets tough.

The baby seems to nurse nonstop!

Breastfeeding on demand is a round-the-clock job. Newborns often nurse every 90 minutes to two and a half hours, because breast milk is quickly digested and these tiny people have a lot of growing to do! Plan to spend many hours bonding with and feeding your infant in the first few weeks. As the baby grows, both of your bodies become more efficient at breastfeeding and it begins to take less time.

The mother has nipple discomfort.

First, make sure the baby is securely latched on, taking in the nipple and most of the areola for maximum comfort and efficient feeding. If nipples become cracked and sore, apply a 100 percent lanolin cream. Watch for signs of infection, and consult your lactation consultant or physician if soreness persists or worsens.
 
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2011, 03:10:30 PM »
Baby Constipation - It's heartbreaking when your baby is constipated.
Your baby hasn't had a bowel movement for 3 or more days - is this normal or is this constipation? Your baby's infrequent bowel movements are hard and dry - is this normal or is this constipation? Find answers to these questions and learn all about constipation and babies.

There are many causes of infant constipation. One of the most common causes of constipation in babies is the introduction of solid foods.

Common Causes of Infant Constipation are:Introduction of solid food(s) - breastfed babies may be more prone to constipation when solid foods are introduced. This is because their tiny tummies are used to processing the easily and highly digestible mother's milk

Diets low in fiber

Diets of excessive dairy products (yogurt, cheeses, milk)

Foods such as Bananas,  Applesauce, Cereals, Breads, Pasta and White Potatoes may contribute or cause constipation

A change in diet usually relieves a baby with constipation. The following tips may also help the constipated baby get things "moving".


Remedies and How to Treat Constipation in Babies
There are many things you can do to help relieve baby's constipation. You can change baby's feeding pattern and/or engage in some physical exercises.

Exercises to Help Relieve Infant Constipation include:Tummy Massage - Gently massage and rub baby's tummy in a clockwise direction.  Place your hands at baby's navel and massage in a circular motion, moving your hand(s) out and away from the center of baby's belly.

Bicycle Legs - Place your baby on her back and lightly hold her legs in a half-bent position.  Gently begin to move your baby's legs as if she is riding a bicycle.  Alternate "Bicycle Legs" with Tummy Massage.  *"Bicycle Legs" also may help to relieve a baby who is gassy.

A Warm Bath - Some medical professionals suggest giving your constipated baby a warm bath.  The thought is that this may help relax baby and "get things moving" again.  Give a tummy massage as you are drying baby.



Relieving Constipation in Babies Younger than 4 Months:
Try giving one to two ounces of diluted fruit juice such as grape, prune or apple-prune twice daily and practice some of the above exercises.  (Always consult your pediatrician about the appropriateness of new foods/liquids to help alleviate constipation) Learn about Fruit Juice in your baby's diet.


Relieving Constipation in Babies 4 Months to 12 months + by Changing the Food Diet
Adding more fiber to baby's diet may help get things moving again. Try strained foods that contain high fiber such as:
apricots

prunes

peaches

plums
 pears

peas

spinach
 

For older infants who are just beginning solid foods, you may want to avoid baby foods such as rice cereal, applesauce and bananas as these may aggravate constipation.

 
 
Get the BRAT Out!
If your baby is constipated, reverse the BRAT diet
The BRAT diet is used for the treatment of diarrhea in infants because these foods help firm up stools. An easy and natural way to remember how to help alleviate baby's constipation is to cut out the foods that contribute to it! BRAT stands for

Bananas,
Rice,
Applesauce and
Toast

If you ever forget which foods to cut out, remember BRAT and cut out those foods!

Barley or oatmeal cereals, prunes, peaches, plums, apricots and most vegetables are preferred when baby has constipation.

Juices are helpful, especially apple or prune, but use in moderation, as they are not as nutritious for babies as formula or breast milk.



Why can I give my baby apple Juice but NOT applesauce when baby is constipated?

There is a difference in the amount of sugars and pectin in apple juice and applesauce:

Apple juice contains more sugars and liquids so it helps relieve constipation.

Applesauce is the whole of the fruit. It may contain a higher level of pectin - which firms up stools and may thus lead to constipation.
"Apple juice also has a mild laxative effect that may help provide relief from constipation commonly experienced by little ones." Apples contain pectin, which will add bulk to your stools, and their cleansing action will encourage bowel movements. They have a laxative effect yet are also used for to help people get back on a regular diet after suffering bouts of diarrhea.

The pectin in the apple fiber apparently is why whole apples will firm up bowel movements. Think of Kaopectate - a popular over-the-counter diarrhea remedy. Kaopectate , actually contains an oxidized form of pectin. Also, that same fiber pectin is what dietitians have been telling us for decades is necessary to keep us regular and to prevent constipation. While it will help prevent constipation by helping to keep the bowels regular, it will not help alleviate constipation.

When it comes to bowel regularity, apples contain two types of fiber; insoluble and soluble. The insoluble fiber works like roughage, while the soluble fiber (pectin), which is found primarily in the skin, acts as a stool softener by drawing water into the stool and increasing stool bulk. Because pectin firms up an excessively loose stool, it’s also used to treat diarrhea.

Source: www.wholesomebabyfood.com
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2011, 06:35:05 PM »
                                                                             Top 10 first baby foods
Is your baby ready to transition to solids? Unsure where to start? Thanks to some slick advertising, many think jarred baby food is the only way to provide your baby with a good nutritional start. So, not true! You can quickly and easily make your own baby food. Here is a collection of ten easy starter foods for your baby, from the moms of Mothers' Support Network.

First, why make your own baby food?


Increased nutritional value: When you cook the food fresh, you preserve the nutritional content of the food. Canned baby food contains water, sugars and starchy fillers that actually dilute the nutritional quality of the food. The living enzymes have been cooked out of jarred (preserved) food.


Elimination of additives: If you choose organically grown produce, you know that your baby is not receiving any harmful chemicals, pesticides or herbicides.


Improved freshness: Have you seen jarred baby food? It looks, tastes and smells different than fresh because it's been heat processed (cooked) twice. Why not give your baby the very best.


Added variety: You choose what fruits and veggies to feed your baby. You can create your own food combinations and you can expose your baby to all kinds of foods.


Enhanced control: Preparing baby food at home provides you with control of your baby's diet and knowledge of exactly what goes into your baby's food.


Lower costs: The average baby in the United States will consume 600 jars of baby food. Parents who use processed baby food spend an average of $300 or more on baby food during their infant's first year of life. Making baby food at home is extremely cost-effective. Baby food prepared at home can cost as little as $55 in the first year. (Source: Cheryl Tallman and Joan Ahlers, Fresh Baby)


Ease: For most of these foods you can simple steam, mash with a fork, and mix in breast milk or water to the consistency your baby prefers. This will vary from baby to baby, so experiment to find your baby's favorite preparation. Some babies are more sensitive to textures and might prefer food that has been through the blender or food processor to reach a nice creamy finish. Other babies are ready right away for foods they can pick up or that is thick enough to stick to their fingers.


Controlled stages: As your baby matures, simply process the food less and less, mixing in less liquid, then none at all, then giving small pieces to pick up instead of mashing.

NOTE: Be sure to start solids slowly and watch for allergies. We don't recommend starting solids until 6 months of age. However, some babies are ready to start before then. Some signs your baby might be ready are: first tooth, sitting up by themselves, grabbing at food on your plate.

1. Rice cereal or oatmeal. Pediatricians recommend starting with an iron-fortified cereal, however you can make your own out of whole grains whose nutrients are intact and don't need fortification. Simply take brown rice, rolled oats or barley flakes and use a blender or food processor (or even a clean coffee grinder) to grind the grains into a powder. This powder then becomes your baby cereal. Cook this powder for 15 minutes until a thin soupy consistency is achieved. It's best to mix with breast milk to begin. You can also try adding blackstrap molasses for extra iron.

2. Avocado. Sodium free, avocados contain such valuable nutrients as fiber, potassium, vitamin E, B-vitamins, and folic acid, in addition to beneficial phytochemicals such as gluthathione, beta-sitosterol, and lutein. Avocados are also full of mono- and polyunsaturated fats, which are important for your baby's brain and neurological development. Simply take a fork and mash up a ripe avocado and spoon into mouth. Easy.

3. Sweet potatoes. Besides just tasting good, these root vegetables are an excellent source of vitamin A. In addition, they are a very good source of vitamin C and manganese and a good source of copper, dietary fiber, vitamin B6, potassium and iron. To prepare for your baby, simply boil, steam or bake potatoes (with skin on) until they are very soft. Peel and mash with a fork. You can add water or breast milk for a smoother consistency. You can freeze leftovers in ice cube trays and then transfer to airtight containers.

4. Bananas. Bananas are a very good source of vitamin B6 and a good source of vitamin C, potassium, dietary fiber and manganese. Bananas are also VERY easy to serve to baby -- simply mash, add breast milk if needed to thin, and serve! We do caution you to not overdue it on bananas, as it can constipate baby. Also, banana skins are very porous, so be sure to buy organic bananas.

 
5. Apples. Apples are a good source of dietary fiber, vitamin C and vitamin K. Babies love apples and they are easy to prepare. Here's a basic recipe: Combine 1/2 cup water, 5 medium apples, cored, peeled and diced in a large saucepan and bring to a gentle boil. You can add a pinch of cinnamon for flavor (if desired). Lower heat and simmer until you get the consistency you want. Then puree the sauce to remove any large pieces, cool and serve. You can also bake an apple in the toaster oven with a sweet potato.

6. Peas. Peas are a great finger food for babies that want to do it themselves. They are a good source of dietary fiber, potassium, zinc, and vitamin A. Simply steam and serve, cutting larger peas in half. For added convenience you can keep peas in the freezer.

7. Peaches. Peaches are high in vitamin C and vitamin A and they contain a great amount of fiber. Peaches are known to have a diuretic affect and also are a natural laxative. The peach is a great fruit to give to your baby in the summer if constipation has become a problem. Peaches may be poached, steamed or baked and then mashed or pureed. Peaches tend to loose their nutritive value with prolonged cooking so baking or steaming them may be the best choice of cooking for optimal nutrient retention.

8. Pears. Pears are a good source of dietary fiber, vitamin C and copper. Serving pears is as easy as mashing with a fork! However, if using for a very first food, you might try steaming and straining to get a smoother consistency.

9. Acorn/Buttermilk Squash. Winter squash is an excellent source of vitamin A. It is a very good source of vitamin C, potassium, dietary fiber, and manganese and a good source of folate, omega-3 fatty acids, thiamin, copper, vitamin B5, vitamin B6, niacin and copper. To prepare squash, cut into small pieces and steam or boil. Puree, mixing in water or breast milk if desired, and serve.

10. Carrots. Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin K. In addition, they are a very good source of vitamin C, dietary fiber and potassium. When preparing carrots, steaming is the very best method for cooking as it allows the beta-carotene to be more bio-available and readily used by the body. You should peel, cut into small pieces and steam until soft. Puree, add water or breast milk, as desired, and serve.

SOURCES: www.wholesomebabyfood.com and The George Mateljan Foundation
 

Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2011, 06:41:36 PM »
Does cooking affects the vitamin C levels in food?

Vitamin C is water soluble - in other words, it dissolves in water. It is also sensitive to light and to heat.
In order to preserve as much vitamin C as possible in the foods you serve your baby, here are some simple guidelines to follow...

Try to ensure that the fruits and veggies you buy for your baby are truly fresh. Produce that has been sitting on store shelves for days on end will have lost some of its vitamin C content. Buying local produce - particularly from farmers' markets - is ideal, because you know that it has not been transported a long distance. If you only have access to fruits and veggies that are clearly NOT as fresh as they should be, then frozen or even canned produce may be preferable. Even though some vitamin C is lost during processing, it may still be less than the amount lost by extended exposure to light and heat.
Look for ripe produce - or allow it to ripen - before serving to baby. Fully ripe fruits and vegetables contain more vitamin C than unripe.
Store your fruits and veggies in a cold, dark place (preferably the fridge!) to minimize vitamin C loss.
Serve fruits and vegetables to your baby raw whenever possible. This doesn't apply to all produce, of course, and may not be appropriate for all babies, depending on their age, stage of development and sensitivities.
If it's possible, try to make baby's food and serve it to him on the same day, as the freezing and subsequent thawing of baby food does contribute to vitamin loss. However, a parent's life is a busy one... and making batches of homemade baby food for the freezer is still preferable to buying commercial baby food, which has undergone infinitely more processing!
Try making baby food with unpeeled fruits and vegetables, as most of the nutrients are stored in - or just under - the skin. Again, there are situations where this may not be appropriate.
Cook fruits and vegetables for the shortest time possible, until they are 'just done' rather than mushy. Overcooking is the quickest way to destroy their vitamin C content!
Try steaming fruits and vegetables rather than boiling them, as less vitamin C is lost this way. Research has also shown that cooking in the microwave keeps in even more vitamins than steaming, although many parents still prefer not to microwave their babies' food.
If you DO boil fruits and vegetables for your baby, add the cooking water back into the food whenever possible. This makes use of the vitamin C that has dissolved - or 'leached' - into the water.
Avoid cooking your fruits and veggies in copper pots - this is believed to destroy their vitamin C content.
Have you ever been told that adding baking soda to your veggies as they're boiling will help retain their bright colour? It will also cause nutrient loss - so don't do it! Vegetables cooked for as short a time as possible should still look bright anyway!



Read more: http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.com/vitamin-C.html#ixzz1Lfagff34
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2011, 06:50:47 PM »
Giving water to baby - 6 months+
The general consensus here seems to be that, although it is not essential, introducing a little water after 6 months of age is not harmful to your baby. Many parents like to give water after solid foods, particularly high protein foods like meat and eggs. If you are considering giving water to baby at this stage, remember to check first with his health care provider.
There are certain circumstances where extra water might be a good idea - if baby is constipated, for example, or has diarrheah. In either case, seek medical advice before offering water to your infant.



Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2011, 05:47:57 PM »
How much should my child eat?

 How much your child eats may be very different from how much another child eats. Don't worry if it seems that your child doesn't eat enough at one meal. Children often make up for a small meal or a missed meal at the next mealtime.

If your child has plenty of energy and is growing, he or she is most likely healthy. Talk to your doctor if you have any concerns about how your child is growing or if you are concerned that picky eating is slowing your child's growth.
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2011, 06:02:16 PM »
What if my child is a picky eater?
Many toddlers are picky eaters. Being picky about food is a normal behavior for many toddlers. There may be times when your child wants to eat a particular food again and again for a while, and then not want to eat it at all. Offer your child a variety of nutritious foods and let him or her choose what to eat. You may want to serve something you know your child likes along with another new nutritious food. But try to let your child explore new foods on his or her own. Don’t force your child to taste new foods. You may need to offer a new food several times before your child tries it.

You may need to be flexible with the meals you prepare to make sure your child gets a balanced diet. For example, if you're making beef stew for dinner and your child will only eat potatoes and carrots, you may need to cook some of these vegetables separate from the stew so that your child will eat them.

You may want to make a list of foods that you know your child likes so you can make sure he or she eats a balanced diet. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Web site, MyPyramid.gov, offers good information about nutrition for children and adults.

Setting a good example for your child can also help. If your child sees you eating a variety of healthy foods, he or she will be more likely to give them a try.

Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2011, 06:03:03 PM »
How can I make sure my child is getting enough to eat?

Offer your child food that is tasty and looks good, and offer the right amount. A good rule of thumb is to offer 1 tablespoon of each kind of food for each year of your child's age. If your child is still hungry, you can serve more. Don't force your child to clean his or her plate. Once he or she is no longer hungry, your child should be allowed to stop eating.

Try not to bribe your child to eat (such as offering dessert as a reward). Threats or punishments aren't good ideas, either. If your child doesn't want to eat, accept his or her refusal. Even though you may be concerned, don't show your child that you are upset by this refusal to eat. If your child is seeking attention, your disapproval fills that need, and he or she may try to gain your attention in the same way another time.
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #13 on: May 29, 2011, 06:04:30 PM »
What about snacks?

Your child should have 3 meals and 2 snacks a day. Toddlers usually don’t eat enough in one meal to remain full until the next mealtime. Offer your child small, healthy snacks in between meals. Some examples of healthy snacks include low-fat string cheese, yogurt cups, apple slices or strawberry halves, slices of lean turkey or whole-grain crackers with peanut butter.

Try not to offer your child snacks close to mealtimes. If the next meal is several hours away, it’s okay to serve a snack. If the meal is in the next hour, avoid offering your child a snack. If your child comes to the table hungry, he or she is more likely to eat the meal.

If your child doesn't eat at one mealtime, you can offer a nutritious snack a few hours later. If your child doesn't eat the snack, offer food again at the next mealtime. A child will usually eat at the second meal. With this approach, you can be sure that your child won't go hungry for too long or have other problems associated with a poor diet.
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1124
    • View Profile
Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #14 on: May 29, 2011, 06:06:32 PM »
How can I make mealtimes easier?

You may want to try the following suggestions to make mealtimes easier and more enjoyable:


•Give your child a heads up. Ten to 15 minutes before mealtime, tell your child that it will be time to eat soon. Children may be so tired or excited from play activities that they don't feel like eating. Letting your child know that it is almost time for a meal will give him or her a chance to settle down before eating.
•Establish a routine. Children are more comfortable with routines and predictability, so set regular mealtimes, have people use the same seats at the table or create a tradition to have each person talk about something fun or interesting that happened to them during the day.
•Reserve mealtimes for eating and for spending quality time with your family. Don't let your child play with toys during mealtimes. Reading books or watching television shouldn't be allowed during mealtimes either. Explain to your child how good it is to eat together and ask him or her to stay at the table until everyone has eaten.
•Make mealtimes pleasant. If mealtimes are pleasant, there is a good chance that your child will begin to look forward to eating with other family members. Try to avoid arguments during mealtime.
•Manage your expectations. Don't expect manners that are too difficult for your child. For example, don't expect a child who is 3 years old to eat with the proper utensil. For many children, a spoon is much easier to handle than a fork.
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University