Author Topic: Foods for Babies  (Read 6638 times)

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #15 on: May 29, 2011, 06:07:34 PM »
What Will We Eat Today

Young children, like all of us, eat because they get hungry. But they also express feelings through their eating.

It is common for a child's appetite to vary from one meal or one day to the next. How fast your child is growing, how active she is, and her general health all affect how much she will eat.

Children differ in their needs for food and their feelings about it. Some are hearty eaters, while others are picky. Some children always eat big meals; others eat small amounts often throughout the day.

Given the chance, most children do a good job of eating the food they need.

What You Can Expect
Children often resist tasting new foods. Try offering something new early in the meal, when your child is most hungry.

Do not force a new food, but do offer it more than once. (You may need to offer as many as ten times before your child will try a taste!) Another tip is to give a new food together with an old favorite.

Though children may turn away from new foods, they do like variety. Serve fruits, vegetables, milk, meat, cheese, cereals, breads, and desserts in child-size portions (though not all of these in one meal!).

All children are messy eaters, and they spill often. Learning table manners and how to use forks and spoons neatly takes time. Buy child-size utensils that are easier to manage, and use plastic cups to avoid breaking glass. Also, make sure the area around the table is safe, and avoid using expensive items that your child could damage easily. Be patient, and set a good example with your own eating habits.

"Food jags"–demanding the same few foods day after day-are common among children 18 months to 3 years old. Your child may want noodles for breakfast, noodles for lunch, and noodles for dinner. Again, be patient, even if you get bored serving the same food. The situation usually changes in a few weeks. Don't fight your child's favorites–just be sure to offer other foods as well.

Encouraging Good Eating
 
You can be sure that your child will eat when he is hungry–even if he doesn't eat as much as you would like.

Your job is to provide nutritious foods that promote good health. Your child should then be allowed to decide how much and even whether or not to eat.

Encourage good eating by providing appealing meals and snacks in a form your child can handle (such as small pieces for finger feeding, or soft foods that don't take a lot of chewing).

For a toddler, plan three meals and healthy snacks so that she eats every two or three hours. As she grows older, the times between eating can become longer. You'll need to make adjustments in how much food you serve and how often. You will also want to set some limits. (For example, you won't want to allow a snack right before mealtime for an older preschooler.) You can also help your child have a healthy appetite by making sure she gets regular activity.

Serve child-size portions that your child can finish before getting too full. A good rule is one level tablespoon of food for each year of age. (So, for example, a 3-year-old would get three tablespoons each of several different healthy foods.) Your child may resist if you serve more than he thinks he can eat. Start small–you can always give a second helping if he eats the first.

If Your Child Refuses to Eat
If your child frequently just won't eat, keep these tips in mind:

•Do not force your child to eat if she does not seem hungry. A child who is going through a time of slow growth or who has been inactive or ill may not be hungry.
•Plan snacks carefully. If a snack is eaten too close before a meal, your child won't be hungry when the mealtime comes. Even for a child who tends to eat small amounts throughout the day, try to concentrate the biggest portions at mealtimes.
•Offer your child choices about what he eats as often as possible. For example, ask, "Do you want an apple or grapes for your snack this afternoon?"
•Be a good example. Children are great imitators, and they watch what you do–so eat your carrots!
•Be aware that even with your best efforts, there may be times when your child just doesn't eat. This is not unusual for preschoolers. If it only happens from time to time, you need not worry.
What to Avoid
To help your child learn to eat in a healthy way, remember these guidelines:

•Avoid using food as a pacifier or to reward behavior. Avoid coaxing, begging, or making a game of mealtime. Do provide a pleasant setting, and eat with your child.
•Avoid offering too much liquid, like juice or milk, during a meal. The liquid may fill your child's stomach, leaving no room for food.
•Avoid rushing through meals. It takes 20 minutes for the brain to tell the body that it has been fed. Children who eat slowly are less likely to overeat.
Making Mealtimes Good Times
Mealtime should be a pleasant experience for both adults and children.

Although busy schedules can make it difficult, try to plan meals so that your child does not eat alone. Include your child in pleasant conversation while you are having a meal together. This will help create a feeling of warmth, love, and security. Eliminate distractions, including TV, and focus instead on the meal. Children who share mealtimes with others are more likely to eat the right amounts of food and even to digest their food better.

These ideas will help make your mealtimes enjoyable and will help your child learn how to act while eating:

•Have the meal ready when your child comes to the table; if she has to wait, she will entertain herself by playing.
•Teach rules for good manners, but don't be too strict: for example, young children cannot be expected to sit perfectly still.
•Encourage the use of a spoon, fork, and knife as your child grows and develops.
•Watch for good manners and praise them.
•Keep mealtime pleasant. Don't allow arguing or scolding, and use a firm voice without shouting to give instructions.
Letting Children Help
Children will be more interested in eating when they are involved in mealtime jobs.

Be adventurous, and let your child do tasks that he is ready for. Children who are 2 and 3 years old can help you with these jobs and many others:

•Help clear dishes from the table, especially their own (but be careful about breakable or heavy items)
•Wipe tables and countertops
•Wash fruits and vegetables
•Place garbage in the trash
•Mix ingredients together
•Open packages
Be sure you always supervise your child in these jobs, and make sure that any dangerous items are out of reach. Choose tasks that match your child's abilities, and show her what to do when she is learning. Make clean-up a part of the job. Wearing an apron keeps clothes clean, and washing hands before touching food and dishes is important.

Books to Read
Reading books with you about food and eating may help your child try new foods or get more interested in mealtime. Check with your public library or local bookstore for these books:

•The Berenstain Bears and Too Much Junk Food by Berenstain, Stan & Jan (Random House, 1986).
•Gregory, the Terrible Eater by Mitchell Sharmat (Scholastic, 1980).
If you'd like more information about helping your child learn how to eat healthy, look for these books:

•A Healthy Head Start by Mary Abbott Hess, Anne E. Hunt, and Barbara M. Stone. (Holt, 1990).
•How to Get Your Kid to Eat ... But Not Too Much by Ellyn Satter (Bull Publishing, 1987).

http://urbanext.illinois.edu/toddlers/eattoday.cfm
« Last Edit: May 29, 2011, 06:21:39 PM by nusrat-diu »
Nusrat Jahan
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Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #16 on: September 07, 2011, 05:03:24 PM »
Most first time mothers think that their child does not know whether he is hungry or not; they think that he is hungry all the times. With this in mind, they feed every half or one hour. This is not good. Note that over-feeding will make the child uncomfortable, he may even vomit, he may have stomach pain or too much gas problem.

If your child is not eating, do not give any incentive or reward for eating, nor make any promises for eating. Also do not punish the child for not eating. Some mothers say:
1. If you eat you will get a surprise gift.
2. If you eat you will get a chocolate.
3. If you don't eat I will not talk to you or I will be angry. Some mothers even take a stick in their hand to force the child to eat.

The best thing is to maintain the timings. Serve him food at fixed timings at fixed intervals. Set a separate plate for him when all are eating.

Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #17 on: September 07, 2011, 05:05:16 PM »
You may like to replace breast milk or formula milk with whole milk, when the child is one year old. Low fat or skim milk is not good for children as they need fat for growth.
Your child should be given fruits, vegetables, breads, grains, and the dairy products to ensure all nutrients.
Give to eat them 4-5 times throughout the day, because toddlers and small children cannot eat much at a time. Follow the principles of the Food Pyramid, portions and number of servings are less for children.
Opened baby food containers should be covered and stored in a refrigerator for not more than two days.
Give only one new food at a time and watch for any allergic reactions.
Avoid foods such as nuts, popcorn, potato chips, corn, grapes, raisins, etc. These foods may choke the baby.
Do not give sweets or sweetened beverages as they contribute to tooth decay due to sugar content Sugar contents of foods.
Do not give soft drinks, coffee, tea, and chocolate.
Do not give any vitamin supplements. A child�s diet may be deficient in calcium, iron, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin B6, and folic acid. Healthy children should get all their nutrients from foods. Standard pediatric multi-vitamins may be given if your pediatrician recommends it.
Do not feed solids in a bottle.
Avoid giving bottle with milk or fruit juice to the baby lying in bed. This can develop nursing bottle mouth that may result in tooth decay.
Citrus Foods: It is better not to give citrus fruits like lemon, limes, grapefruits, tangerines, tomato and oranges until baby is 12 months old due mostly to the acidity of the fruit which may cause diaper rash, skin rashes and tummy pains. A sensitivity to citric acids is generally not found after 1 year of age. You should also avoid pineapple although it is not a citrus food, but it can be acidic.
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #18 on: October 02, 2011, 04:16:46 PM »
Why can I introduce Yogurt earlier than 12 months?

Yogurt may be introduced as early as 6 months old, (the typical age recommendation is 8 months old) depending on your baby’s pediatrician and your baby’s propensity to allergies.

Here are 2 reasons why introducing Yogurt (and cheese) is different than introducing milk:

 Unlike Whole Cow Milk beverage, your baby is not at risk of formula/breast milk being replaced by Yogurt or Cheese. The medical community worries that if Whole Cow milk is introduced to an infant prior to 1 year old, that parents would stop formula and/or breastfeeding and use Milk as the replacement. This would be dangerous to your baby's health.


 Lactose is already broken down with the culturing of the yogurt or cheese and milk proteins are either removed or limited thus it is typically easier to digest; people with lactose intolerance often are be able to handle cheese and/or yogurt without trouble. The same is true for some people with a milk protein (either to the casein or the whey) allergy.

Yogurt is a great way for baby to get calcium and the “bacteria” in yogurt that is so good for our digestive systems. Yogurt is also a great way for baby to get the fat that is so highly needed during baby’s first year. The majority of yogurts on the market are made low fat or non fat but babies need the fat!
Nusrat Jahan
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Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #19 on: March 10, 2012, 02:12:41 PM »
Feeding Your 2 Year-Old

Feeding your two year-old is not always easy. Here are some ideas that may help.

Meal Times
Give just a little bit of food at each meal. Two-year-olds don’t eat a lot.
You can always give more food if your child wants it.

    Don’t get into fights about food.
    You shouldn’t force your child to eat.
    Don’t give a cookie or other treat to get your child to eat.
    Stay with your child at mealtime.
    Turn off the TV and talk.

Sometimes your child may be too busy to stop and eat. Have a quiet time before meals. How about playing with crayons and paper and then washing hands before meals?

Snacks
Snacks should be like little meals for your 2 year-old. Try cheese and crackers, yogurt and fruit, cereal and milk or half a sandwich and juice. A snack with protein in it lasts longer. Protein foods are foods such as milk, cheese, yogurt, meat, chicken, dried beans, peanut butter and eggs. Sometimes grandparents and older sisters and brothers like to spoil a young child with sweets and soft drinks. Make some rules and stick with them.

Helpful Hints

    Give praise that makes your child feel successful at eating. Your child is learning that he or she is worth something. This is very important.
    Start teaching good habits such as eating a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables.
    Brush teeth or at least rinse with water after meals.
    Buy lowfat milk or skim milk after the second birthday, unless your child needs the extra calories of whole milk. When your child is thirsty, offer water.
    Be patient and give a lot of love to your child. Feeding will get a lot easier as your child gets older.
     

Food                    Daily Servings    Serving Sizes
Bread, Cereal,
Rice, and Pasta           7             1/2 Slice or 1/4 Cup
Fruit                          3             1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
Vegetables                3             1/4 Cup Cooked: 1/2 Cup Raw
Milk, Yogurt
and Cheese           5            1/2 Cup; 3/4 Ounce Cheese
Meat, Poultry,
Fish, and Dry Beans    2             1 Tablespoon; 1 Egg;
                                                1/2 Cup Cooked Beans and Eggs

Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline fatema_diu

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Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #20 on: November 21, 2012, 01:18:21 PM »
perfect topic for mothers! For me too.
Thanks madam!

Offline saratasneem

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Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #21 on: December 08, 2012, 03:09:12 PM »
We should be aware of the digestive capacity of our children.

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2013, 03:48:43 PM »
Dear Fatema and Tasneem Madam,

Thanks for your valuable comments.
Nusrat Jahan
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Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline ABM Nazmul Islam

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Re: Foods for Babies
« Reply #23 on: June 16, 2014, 10:49:29 AM »
very rich post with complete package
ABM Nazmul Islam

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Dept. of Natural Science
Daffodil Int. University, Dhaka, Bangladesh