Author Topic: Baby Health Issue  (Read 4200 times)

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: Baby Health Issue
« Reply #15 on: June 19, 2011, 04:48:37 PM »
Baby Skin Care Products
Shopping for baby skin care products? Less is more. Look for items without dyes, fragrance, phthalates and parabens -- all of which could cause skin irritation. When in doubt, talk to your pediatrician to see if a product is appropriate for newborn skin.
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: Baby Health Issue
« Reply #16 on: August 02, 2011, 03:50:19 PM »
All-Natural Cold & Cough Remedies

Concerns about the safety of over-the-counter cold medicines for children have left many parents searching for alternative remedies for children's cold and cough symptoms.

Popular over-the-counter cold and cough remedies for infants have been withdrawn from the market after the FDA warned in January 2008 against giving those types of medicines to children younger than 2 because of the possibility of serious harm or death.

While the FDA is considering whether to change the guidelines for children ages 2 to 11, the Consumer Healthcare Products Association in October 2008 said they would voluntarily change the labels on cough and cold medications to say they should not be used in children younger than 4. An FDA advisory panel made a similar recommendation in October 2008, saying that nonprescription cold medicines should not be given to children ages 2 to 5.

The nonprescription remedies include antihistamines for runny noses, decongestants for stuffy noses, cough suppressants, and expectorants for loosening mucus to relieve congestion.

Children get six to 10 colds a year on average, according to the National Institutes of Health. And as surely as children get the sniffles, parents want to ease their symptoms.

The bad news for parents: No home remedies or cold medicines will make a cold go away faster; they usually run their course in seven to 10 days. At best, some medicines will relieve symptoms. But even that is in question, says Sheela R. Geraghty, MD, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio. She recommends fluids, reducing fever to make a child comfortable, and keeping noses suctioned so babies can eat comfortably.

“To be honest with you, that’s about it,” Geraghty says. “Time is what helps with colds.”

For more specific guidance on soothing coughs and other cold symptoms, WebMD talked to the American Academy of Pediatrics, the FDA, Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, Geraghty, Rachel Dodge, MD, MPH, a pediatrician with Johns Hopkins Children’s Center in Baltimore, and Joyce Allers, RN, clinical program manager of the School Health Program at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Here are their suggestions:

Fluids
Make sure children stay hydrated, and give them what they’re accustomed to drinking. For babies, stick to breast milk or formula for those younger than 6 months. An oral electrolyte solution designed for infants, such as Pedialyte, also can be given. Don’t give straight water to babies younger than 6 months; their kidneys can’t process it correctly and an electrolyte imbalance may occur.

For children older than 12 months, try water, diluted juice, and milk.

Sometimes parents hear that they shouldn’t give milk because it promotes mucus building. That’s an old wives’ tale with no scientific evidence to back it up, Geraghty says. It’s especially important for babies to continue drinking breast milk or formula.

Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: Baby Health Issue
« Reply #17 on: August 02, 2011, 03:51:40 PM »
Coughing
Give a half-teaspoon of honey to children ages 2 to 5; 1 teaspoon to children ages 6 to 11; and 2 teaspoons to those 12 and older, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends. Do not give honey to babies younger than 1 because of the risk of infant botulism.

Smoke can irritate already inflamed airways. Don’t smoke in a home with children, advice that extends beyond cold season. While children have colds, keep them away from smoke from other sources, too, such as grills and wood-burning fires.

If the coughing is so severe that it keeps a child from sleeping, or if the cough lasts beyond 10 days, discuss it with a doctor.

Scratchy Throat
Soft foods such as puddings, Popsicles, chicken soup, gelatin desserts, and ice cream can feel good to a scratchy throat, Allers says. If a child doesn’t feel like eating their usual diet, try some of these foods.

Congestion
Saline nasal drops can help relieve congestion, especially in an infant’s small nasal passages. Because babies breathe through their noses and not their mouths, breaking up nasal congestion can make it easier to breathe, allowing a baby to nurse or drink from a bottle more comfortably.

Place a few of the salt water drops in each nostril to thin mucus, wait at least 60 seconds, then use a blue bulb syringe to gently remove discharge. For infants, try this before feeding.

Saline drops or spray also can relieve stuffy noses in older children. Have children wait 60 seconds after using the spray before gently blowing their noses.

Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: Baby Health Issue
« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2011, 03:56:01 PM »
When to Call a Doctor
A child is so weak and tired he doesn’t respond well.
A child doesn’t play for at least a few minutes in a four-hour period while he is awake.
If a child complains of a tight feeling in his chest, or that his chest hurts.
If, after seeing a doctor, a child starts wheezing or having more difficulty breathing.
If an infant can’t be calmed by methods that usually work, like singing, rocking, or giving a pacifier.
A child tugs at her ear or shows sign of ear pain.
Fever of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher in a child 3 months or younger.
Fever for more than three days in an older baby or child.
If the child appears dehydrated. For babies younger than 12 months, that means a dry diaper after six to eight hours. For older children, that means no urination for more than eight hours. No tears when crying, sunken eyes, and dry lips are also indicators of dehydration.
A child has bloody mucus or saliva.
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline tushar_200727

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Re: Baby Health Issue
« Reply #19 on: August 29, 2011, 12:23:25 PM »
thank you M'am for this topic. It'll be very helpful to us.
Sanaullah Tushar
Department of CSE
Daffodil International University
email: sanaullah1242@diu.edu.bd