Author Topic: HAIKU  (Read 7858 times)

Offline shamsi

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HAIKU
« on: June 26, 2011, 09:55:05 AM »


Haiku is a very short form of Japanese poetry typically characterized by three qualities:

# The essence of haiku is "cutting" (kiru). This is often represented by the juxtaposition of two images or ideas and a kireji or 'cutting word' between them, a kind of verbal punctuation mark which signals the moment of separation and colours the manner in which the juxtaposed elements are related.

# Traditional haiku consist of 17 sounds (also known as morae), in three phrases of 5, 7 and 5 on respectively. Any one of the three phrases may end with the kireji.Although haiku are often stated to have 17 syllables,this is incorrect as syllables and on are not the same.

#A kigo (seasonal reference), usually drawn from a saijiki ,an extensive but defined list of such words. The majority of kigo, but not all, are drawn from the natural world. This, combined with the origins of haiku in pre-industrial Japan, has led to the inaccurate impression that haiku are necessarily nature poems.

Modern Japanese gendai haiku are increasingly unlikely to follow the tradition of 17 on or to take nature as their subject, but the use of juxtaposition continues to be honored in both traditional haiku and gendai. There is a common, although relatively recent, perception that the images juxtaposed must be directly observed everyday objects or occurrences.

In Japanese, haiku are traditionally printed in a single vertical line while haiku in English often appear in three lines to parallel the three phrases of Japanese haiku.

Previously called hokku, haiku was given its current name by the Japanese writer Masaoka Shiki at the end of the 19th century.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haiku_%28disambiguation%29

Offline shamsi

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2011, 09:57:31 AM »
   Example of Haiku:1

    the first cold shower
    even the monkey seems to want
    a little coat of straw

Offline nusrat-diu

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2011, 06:37:55 PM »
A Haiku to Shamsi:

You and I
wanted to have some icecream
Alas! we couldn't make time.
Nusrat Jahan
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

Offline Nahid Kaiser

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2011, 02:53:05 PM »

A Haiku inspired by Nusrat's one. Shamsi, can you tell me whether it has become one?

Me and my life
walk together but
can't see each-other

Offline shamsi

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2011, 03:16:41 PM »
Dear Nusrat Madam and Nahid Madam,

Its really nice to see you inspired and writing your own Haiku.There is a bit structural flaw but the ideas are really awesome.

Thanks

Shamsi


Offline shipra

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2011, 03:48:42 PM »
Dear Shamsi Madam,

Thank you for this.As my field is Applied Linguistics and ELT,I didn't know anything about `Haiku' before.Now,I've got some knowledge about this poetry.It's useful for me.So,thank you,madam.

With Regards.
Shipra

Offline shamsi

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2011, 08:56:49 AM »
How to Write a Haiku:

Steps:

1.   
Understand the way haiku is made. This can best be done by reading as many haiku as you can. Be aware that translations of the Old Masters of Japan are not written in proper English haiku, and many translators are not poets so their versions may show their lack of understanding of the haiku in the English language.
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2.   
What you feel should be in a haiku. When you see or notice something that makes you want to say to others -"Hey, look at that!"-include that in a haiku. Many people go for walks just to find new inspiration for their poetry.

3.   
Many haiku seem to focus on nature, but what they are really focusing on is a seasonal reference (not all of which are necessarily about nature). Japanese poets use a "saijiki" or season word almanac to check the seasonal association for key words that they might use in a haiku (thus the haiku is a seasonal poem, and often about nature. But it does not have to be about nature if the seasonal reference is about a human activity). The season is important for coming up with words to use in a haiku, because the poem has so few words, simple phrases such as "cherry blossoms" or "falling leaves" can create lush scenes, yet still reflect the feeling of the verse. Moreover, season words also invoke other poems that use the same season word, making the poem part of a rich historical tapestry through allusive variation. In Japanese, the "kigo" or season word was generally understood; "autumn breeze" might be known to express loneliness and the coming of the dark winter season.
o   Winter usually makes us think of burden, cold, sadness, hunger, tranquility, death or peace. Ideas about winter can be invited with words like "snow," "ice," "dead tree," "leafless," etc.
o   Summer brings about feelings of warmth, vibrancy, love, anger, vigor, lightness, action. General summer phrases include references to the sky, beaches, heat, and romance.
o   Autumn brings to mind a very wide range of ideas: decay, belief in the supernatural, jealousy, saying goodbye, loss, regret, and mystery to name a few. Falling leaves, shadows, and autumn colors are common implementations.
o   Spring, like summer, can make one think of beauty, but it is usually more a sense of infatuation. Also common are themes like innocence, youth, passion, and fickleness. Blossoms, new plants, or warm rains can imply spring. For more information on seasons, go to the link listed below.

Seasonal references can also include human activities, and Japanese saijikis contain many such listings. Be aware that some references to human activities, such as Christmas, are effective season words, but require a geographical limitation; while Christmas is a winter season word in the northern hemisphere, it's a summer reference in the southern hemisphere.

4.   
Add a contrast or comparison. Reading most haiku, you'll notice they either present one idea for the first two lines and then switch quickly to something else or do the same with the first line and last two. A Japanese haiku achieves this shift with what is called a "kireji" or cutting word, which cuts the poem into two parts. In English, it is essential for nearly every haiku to have this two-part juxtapositional structure. The idea is to create a leap between the two parts, and to create an intuitive realization from what has been called an "internal comparison." These two parts sometimes create a contrast, sometime a comparison. Creating this two-part structure effectively can be the hardest part of writing a haiku, because it can be very difficult to avoid too obvious a connection between the two parts, yet also avoid too great a distance between them that , although this is not necessary provided that the grammar clearly indicates that a shift has occurred.

5.   
Use primarily objective sensory description. Haiku are based on the five senses. They are about things you can experience, not your interpretation or analysis of those things. To do this effectively, it is good to rely on sensory description, and to use mostly objective rather than subjective words.

6.   
Like any other art, haiku takes practice. Basho said that each haiku should be a thousand times on the tongue. It is important to distinguish between pseudo-haiku that says whatever the author thinks in a 5-7-5 syllable pattern and literary haiku that adheres to the use of season words, a two-part juxtapositional structure, and primarily objective sensory imagery.


I hope it will be helpful for all of you who are planning to write their own Haiku.

Bests

Shamsi

Offline shamsi

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2011, 09:05:58 AM »
I have been interested in HAIKU from my student life because of its form,projection and appeal.Yesterday,I shared it with one of my newly joined colleagues Hasan Ashikur Rahman and today he has brought a book on HAIKU written by one of his friends named Quamrul Hassan.The book titled,'Spring Moon' is a recent one and really worth buying.Anyways,I can't resist myself from sharing some of the HAIKU from it.Here we go:

1.
winter morning
a slice of the sun
on my blanket

2.
her lipstick
on the baby's cheek
half moon

3.
friends waiting
i take a shawl
late autumn evening

Have a good day.

Shamsi

Offline shamsi

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #8 on: June 28, 2011, 09:19:21 AM »
 
in own cubical
with own mirror reflection
relishing haiku

(This is my first HAIKU)

I hope you will enjoy it.

Have a nice day.

Shamsi

Offline shipra

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #9 on: June 28, 2011, 09:57:56 AM »
Oh Madam,really great!Nice haiku.Congratulations,Our Poet!

Offline asma alam

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #10 on: June 28, 2011, 10:17:25 AM »
Congratulations Shamsi Madam for your new achievement (for writing haiku). At last your interest in haiku has tempted you to write haiku. I enjoyed.

Offline kulsum

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #11 on: June 28, 2011, 10:32:57 AM »
Drops of monsoon dripping on woods

i would wet i suppose

oh, it was a dream rainbow oppose


Hey All,

i am inspired.....aha....feeling great!
 :) :)

thanx shamsi..thanx all

UK miss

Offline Nahid Kaiser

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #12 on: June 28, 2011, 12:55:28 PM »
We can encourage our students to write Haiku as well. When I was a student at DU we had published a wall magazine on Haiku.

Offline shamsi

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #13 on: June 29, 2011, 11:52:49 AM »
Dear Nahid,

I was also thinking about the idea.Thanks for your inspiration.Yes,we can encourage our students writing Haiku and can plan to have a wall-magazine.But I think,it will need some time.So,we can plan to have it next semester(as I have already made this semester's announcement).Meanwhile,we can teach them how to write it.

Regards

Shamsi

Offline shamsi

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Re: HAIKU
« Reply #14 on: June 29, 2011, 11:56:45 AM »
Difference between Japanese Haiku and English language Haiku:

The Japanese haiku and the English language haiku have several critical differences. In Japanese the haiku is composed of 17 sound units divided into three parts - one with 5 units, one with 7 units and another with 5 units. Since sound units are much shorter than English syllables, it has been found that following the Japanese example results in a much longer poem often filled up to make the count with unnecessary words.


The Japanese write their haiku in one line, in order to see clearly the parts of the haiku. In English each part is given a line. This allows the reader time to form an image in the mind before the eyes go back to the left margin for more words. The line breaks also act as a type of punctuation. The kigo, or season word, is a vital part of the Japanese haiku, but in English it is often ignored and not well understood. Therefore, a great number of English haiku do not have a season word and yet are considered to be haiku. The Japanese, because of their longer history of reading haiku, understand that there are two parts to the poem. In English these are called the phrase and fragment. One line is the fragment and the other two lines combine grammatically to become the phrase. Without this combining the two lines together the haiku will sound ‘choppy’ as the voice drops at the end of each line.