Author Topic: Fast Facts About Malnutrition  (Read 218 times)

Offline nfe fouzia

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Fast Facts About Malnutrition
« on: August 11, 2018, 10:20:10 AM »
General information

Two billion people in the world suffer from various forms of malnutrition.
Malnutrition is an underlying cause of death of 2.6 million children each year – a third of child deaths globally.
1 in 4 of the world’s children are stunted
In developing countries this is as high as one in three.5  This means their bodies fail to develop fully as a result of malnutrition.
Undernutrition accounts for 11 per cent of the global burden of disease and is considered the number one risk to health worldwide.

Offline nfe fouzia

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Re: Fast Facts About Malnutrition
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2018, 10:21:11 AM »
Economic impact

Adults who were malnourished as children earn at least 20% less on average than those who weren’t.
Countries may lose two to three percent of their Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as a result of iron, iodine, and zinc deficiencies.
Estimates show annual investments of US$ 347 million to provide micronutrients to 80 percent of the world’s malnourished would yield US$ 5 billion in improved earnings and healthcare spending. 
It is calculated that each dollar spent on nutrition delivers between US$ 8 and US$138 of benefits.

Offline nfe fouzia

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Re: Fast Facts About Malnutrition
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2018, 10:22:55 AM »
Micronutrient deficiencies

 It is estimated half of anaemia cases are due to iron deficiency.  Almost half of children in low- and middle-income countries – 47% of under-fives – are affected by anaemia, impairing cognitive and physical development.  Iron is a key component of micronutrient blends which are used in large-scale and targeted fortification programs.

 Iodine deficiency is the greatest single cause of mental retardation and brain damage. It can easily be prevented by adding iodine to salt. Between 1990 and 2009, the number of households consuming iodized salt rose from 20% to 70%. Coincidently, the number of countries in which iodine-deficiency disorders were considered a public health concern reduced by 43% between 1993 and 2007.

 Vitamin A deficiency causes early childhood blindness and increases the severity of infections and anaemia. It affects an estimated 190 million pre-school aged children, and 19 million pregnant and breastfeeding women globally. Vitamin A can be added to cooking oil as well as wheat and maize flour. It is also included in micronutrient powders.

 Zinc deficiency affects children’s health and physical growth; it is also essential for mothers during pregnancy. It is estimated to cause 4% of deaths in pre-school aged children in lower-income countries.  Zinc supplementation improves growth in stunted children and can be included in wheat flour, maize flour or rice.

Offline effatara

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Re: Fast Facts About Malnutrition
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2018, 03:37:39 PM »
Informative post....
Effat Ara Jahan
Lecturer
Department of Nutrition and Food Engineering
Faculty of Allied Health Sciences

Offline imran986

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Re: Fast Facts About Malnutrition
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2019, 01:36:31 PM »
Informative post.
...........................
Md. Emran Hossain
Coordination Officer
Department of Nutrition and Food Engineering (NFE)
Daffodil International University