Author Topic: Scientists detect a repeating signal from deep space, but its origin is a myster  (Read 95 times)

Offline SSH Shamma

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To begin, there's zero evidence it's aliens.

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Scientists detect a repeating signal from deep space, but its origin is a mystery
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 The uniquely shaped CHIME telescope in British Columbia.
The uniquely shaped CHIME telescope in British Columbia.
IMAGE: CHIME
BY MARK KAUFMAN
JAN 10, 2019
To begin, there's zero evidence it's aliens.


But for just the second time, a team of astronomers detected a flash of repeating of radio waves emanating from beyond our Milky Way galaxy. Using a new, sprawling Canadian telescope dubbed CHIME — which is the size of six hockey rinks — scientists identified the short, repeating burst in the summer of 2018 and published their results Wednesday in the journal Nature. 

The source of these super distant signals, from some 1.5 billion light years away, is still largely a mystery. What's agreed upon is that for these radio waves to travel millions of light years and arrive at Earth as strong signals, they must have a profoundly potent origin — perhaps a powerful explosion in another galaxy.
"We don’t know what can cause an emission that is that powerful," Shriharsh Tendulkar, an astrophysicist at McGill University and study coauthor, said in an interview.

"We really don’t know what they are," added Marc Kamionkowski, a professor of physics and astronomy at Johns Hopkins University who had no involvement in the study, in an interview. "There is good evidence they’re coming from outside the Milky Way."
While scientists have detected more than 60 instances of fast radio bursts — which last just milliseconds — this is just the second known signal coming from the same location.

Lots of things in space produce radio waves, and many of these signals hit Earth. "There are all sorts of radio waves arriving at all times," said Tendulkar. The sun is constantly sending radio waves through the solar system. And there's a number of powerful phenomena in the deep universe that blast radio waves into the cosmos — like black holes.

Scientists are certainly deep in thought about where these distant, quick bursts might come from.

"There is a lot of speculation in the astrophysical transient community about the origin of these events and a number of theories have been put forward to explain how they are formed," Kate Maguire, a researcher at the Astrophysics Research Center at Queen’s University Belfast who had no involvement in the study, said over email.
Syeda Sumbul Hossain
Lecturer, SWE
Daffodil International University
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Offline Raisa

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:)

Offline Tapushe Rabaya Toma

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Thanks for sharing  :)