Author Topic: SAINT MARTIN  (Read 24 times)

Offline Kamrul Hasan Bhuiyan

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SAINT MARTIN
« on: April 01, 2019, 04:29:22 PM »
From 1989 to 2004, non-residential Bangladeshis and foreigners were the only people permitted on the island; however, this has changed and now residential Bangladeshis are allowed. St. Martin's Island has become a tourist spot, and five shipping liners run daily trips to the island. Tourists can book their trip either from Chittagong or from Cox's Bazar. The surrounding coral reef has an extension named Chera Dwip. A small bush is there, which is the only green part. People do not live on this part, so it is advisable for the tourists to go there early and come back by afternoon.[original research?]

A number of efforts have beeb proposed to preserve the several endangered species of turtles that nest on the island, as well as the corals, some of which are found only on Narikel Jinjira.[citation needed] Pieces of the coral reef are being removed to be sold to tourists.[5] Nesting turtles are sometimes taken for food, and their hatchlings are often distracted by the twinkling lights along the beach. Fish, a few recently discovered, are being overfished. Every year the fishermen must venture further out to sea to get their catch. Most of them use motorless boats.

It is possible to walk around the island in a day because it measures only 8 km2 (3 sq. mile), shrinking to about 5 km2 (2 sq. mi) during high tide. The island exists only because of its coral base, so removal of that coral risks erosion of the beach. Because of this, St. Martin's has lost roughly 25% of its coral reef in the past seven years