Author Topic: Kazi Nazrul Islam and Our Struggle for Emancipation  (Read 36 times)

Offline Johir Uddin

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Kazi Nazrul Islam and Our Struggle for Emancipation
« on: October 09, 2019, 11:35:13 PM »
"In fact, one can place Nazrul’s work in the global tradition of what the French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre once called littérature engage—the tradition of socially committed, politically engaged, radically interventionist literary productions. I’ve argued elsewhere that Nazrul is more than a ‘rebel poet;’ that, more appropriately, and by his own admissions, Nazrul is a revolutionary poet. I’ve also argued that in the interest of decolonizing comparative literature as well as our own mind, Nazrul can profitably be situated in the constellation of a whole host of anticapitalist and anticolonial poets from Asia, Africa, and Latin America—ones who poetically and powerfully mediated and mobilized the cause of revolutionary politics without degenerating into vulgar didacticism."

Read more here: https://www.thedailystar.net/literature/news/kazi-nazrul-islam-and-our-struggle-emancipation-1748446
Md. Johir Uddin Shohag
Lecturer
Department of Law
Daffodil International University

Offline Johir Uddin

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Re: Kazi Nazrul Islam and Our Struggle for Emancipation
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2019, 11:36:44 PM »
"Nazrul’s productivity, however, did not interfere with the quality of his poetry as well as with the variety of thematic and stylistic trajectories he pursued in his work. Take the year 1922 alone as an example. In that year Nazrul published his famous poem “Bidrohi” (the Rebel)—a rhetorically high-voltage and linguistically explosive poem, a politically charged anticolonial work, a stylistically innovative intervention, one that itself exemplarily stages an unprecedented mythopoesis and even morphs into a mode of praxis against all forms and forces of oppression in the world. This poem immediately established Nazrul as the “rebel poet” in Bangla literature. And in the same year Nazrul also wrote a number of poems, at least 18 other poems, each of which is amazingly unique. For instance, on the one hand, he gave us a poem like “Bidrohi,” and on the other a poem like “Dodul Dul,” experimenting with the Arabic meter called Motaqarib and producing fast-paced rap-like beats and cadences hitherto unknown in Bangla poetry."
Md. Johir Uddin Shohag
Lecturer
Department of Law
Daffodil International University