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Messages - Afroza Akhter Tina

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1
Thanks for sharing the ideas.


Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU

2
Applied Linguistics & ELT / 7 Ideas for Fabulous Lesson Warm Ups
« on: Yesterday at 10:38:12 AM »
1. Make it a Habit
One really great way to start a lesson is with a single activity you can establish as a habit for every lesson that follows. For example, with my youngest learners, we always started each and every lesson with a song – the same song for an entire semester, then we switched and learned a different one. It was our way of greeting each other, and it marked the official start of the lesson. Needless to say, young children thrive on habits and routines, and it’s really helpful to have solid routines in place!

For older ESL students, you may also choose one activity with which to start the lesson. Start the day with a “What’s New?” segment. Ask adult ESL learners to share a piece of news they’ve heard over the weekend. Or start each class with a different Tongue Twister to loosen up those lazy tongues.

2. Make it Visual
What will you be talking about in the day’s lesson? The seasons and the weather? Start the class by introducing the topic with a picture, photo or even a video. Warm ups are great ways to get students to start thinking about the day’s topic.

3. Make it a Review
Did your class learn a bunch of new words last time? Vocabulary related to health? Show photos of sick people and describe their symptoms; have your students diagnose the patients.

4. Make it a Game
Who says you can’t start the lesson with a game? Games are great ways to review what students learned in previous lessons, plus they’re highly effective for getting students motivated from the get-go. Play a card game to review vocabulary or a verb ping pong, where one student says a verb and another has to say it in past (or use it in a specific tense). Because we’re talking about warm ups here, I recommend that you keep it short – just a 5 or 10-minute activity.

5. Make it Active
Does it make sense to get your class out of their seats just seconds after they sit down? Absolutely! Everyone understands the importance of a warm up before physical activity, and even though learning English is not a physical activity per se, it’s always a good idea to get hearts pumping and students stretching their muscles to prepare for a lesson filled with activity. Warm ups that involve a TPR (Total Physical Response) set the tone, and students know what to expect from the lesson, or at the very least they know what not to expect: to be sitting for the duration of the class.

6. Make it Conversational
In far too many cases, students enter the ESL classroom and immediately open a book. Why not start with a speaking activity? Present a discussion topic, a conversation starter or an ice breaker – anything to get them speaking!

7. Make it Specific
Say you’ve planned your lesson with a specific goal in mind, like “Making plans with friends”. Another great warm-up activity is to introduce the topic and have the class define a more specific, targeted goal. So towards the end of the warm up, their new lesson goal will be something like, “Making plans to go out with friends on Friday night”. You’ll carry out all of the activities as planned (no need to change your lesson plan), but your students will know that by the end of the lesson they’ll be able to do this. (And it’s a good idea to close the lesson with a role play that confirms the achievement of the goal.)




Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU


3
Applied Linguistics & ELT / Re: Turning talk into learning
« on: Yesterday at 10:35:26 AM »
Turn and Talk is an oral language support strategy that provides students scaffolded interactions to formulate ideas and share their thinking with another student. When Turn and Talk is used, all students have a chance to share their thinking in a low-risk setting.


Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU

4
English Grammar / Linking verbs, helping verbs, and action verbs
« on: September 16, 2019, 12:38:31 PM »
Linking verbs link the subject and the subject's state of being; helping verbs help the main verb in the sentence; action verbs express physical and/or mental action.


Explanation:
sources:
www.softschools.com/examples/grammar/linking_verbs_examples/63/
www.softschools.com/examples/grammar/action_verbs_examples/55/
grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-speech/verbs/Helping-Verbs.html


Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU


5
English Language Skills / Re: Phrases and Idioms
« on: September 16, 2019, 12:33:57 PM »
Interesting Sir! Thank you for sharing.



Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU

6
English Language Skills / Games to learn American English
« on: September 16, 2019, 12:32:26 PM »
Please go through the link below and get ideas regarding using games in the class to learn English.



Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU

7
Writing Skill / Re: Writing notes in the class
« on: May 28, 2019, 10:26:12 AM »
Note-taking is important indeed!Thanks for sharing the information Madam.


Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU

8
Applied Linguistics & ELT / Re: Listening a song
« on: May 15, 2019, 10:45:12 AM »
I do agree Madam.Thanks for sharing!


Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU

9
You can repeat anything dear Madam. In fact,your post reminded me some of the important points which I forgot!Thank you.


Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU

10
Thanks for sharing!


Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU

11
I have shared this on 21st October 2018(the link has been provided below).However,good to see it again.


https://forum.daffodilvarsity.edu.bd/index.php/topic,52255.0.html



Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU


12
Listening Skill / Re: Listening a song
« on: April 23, 2019, 12:51:21 PM »
The idea is great Madam.Can you please share some interesting links/songs with us?




Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU

13
Speaking Skill / Re: THE ART OF SPEAKING
« on: April 23, 2019, 12:48:49 PM »
This is a great effort indeed Sir! Thank you for sharing the videos with us.I will try to share the links with my students.



Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU

14
English Grammar / Re: Difference between British & American English
« on: April 04, 2019, 11:23:26 AM »
I have shared this with my students of 'English Language Usage'.


Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU

15
Reading Skill / Re: How to Improve Reading Comprehension
« on: March 25, 2019, 02:41:17 PM »
Reading Comprehension Tips

 
Improving your vocabulary and increasing the amount of time you spend reading overall will help you to improve your reading comprehension over time, but what do you do to help you to comprehend a particular piece of text?
Here, I'll walk you through the steps to take as you're reading so that you can understand the text and improve how you're reading, when you're reading.

 
Tip 1: Stop When You Get Confused and Try to Summarize What You Just Read
As you read, let yourself stop whenever you lose focus or feel confused. Just stop. Now, without re-reading, summarize aloud or in your head what you've comprehended so far (before the place where you became confused).

Skim back through the text and compare how you've summarized it with what's written on the page. Do you feel you've captured the salient points? Do you feel a little more focused on what's going on now that you've put the material into your own words?

Keep reading with your summation in mind and let yourself stop and repeat the process whenever the piece becomes confusing to you. The more you're able to re-contextualize the work in your own words, the better you'll be able to understand it and lock the information in your mind as you keep reading.

 
Tip 2: If You’re Struggling, Try Reading Aloud
Sometimes, we can form a sort of “mental block” that can halt our reading progress for whatever reason (maybe the sentence looks complex or awkward, maybe you’re tired, maybe you feel intimidated by the word choice, or are simply bored).

Reading these problematic passages aloud can often help circumvent that block and help you to form a visual of what the text is trying to convey.

 
Tip 3: Re-read (or Skim) Previous Sections of the Text
For the most part, reading is a personal activity that happens entirely in your head. So don’t feel you have to read just like anyone else if "typical" methods don’t work for you. Sometimes it can make the most sense to read (or re-read) a text out of order.

It is often helpful to glance backwards through a piece of text (or even re-read large sections) to remind yourself of any information you need and have forgotten—what happened previously, what a particular word means, who a person was...the list is endless.

Previous sentences, sections, or even whole chapters can provide helpful context clues. Re-reading these passages will help to refresh your memory so that you can better understand and interpret later sections of the text.

 
Tip 4: Skim or Read Upcoming Sections of the Text
Just like with the previous step, don’t feel that the only way to read and understand a text is to work through it completely linearly. Allow yourself the freedom to take apart the text and put it back together again in whichever way makes the most sense to you.

Sometimes a current confusion in a work will be explained later on in the text, and it can help you to know that explanations are upcoming or even just to read them ahead of time.

So skip forward or backwards, re-read or read ahead as you need to, take the piece in whatever order you need to in order to make sense of the text. Not everyone thinks linearly, and not everyone best understands texts linearly either.

 
Tip 5: Discuss the Text With a Friend (Even an Imaginary Friend)
Sometimes discussing what you know so far about a text can help clear up any confusion. If you have a friend who hasn't read the text in question, then explain it to them in your own words, and discuss where you feel your comprehension is lacking. You'll find that you've probably understood more than you think once you've been forced to explain it to someone who's completely unfamiliar with the piece.

Even if no one else is in the room, trying to teach or discuss what a passage says or means with “someone else” can be extremely beneficial. In fact, software engineers call this technique “rubber duck debugging,” wherein they explain a coding problem to a rubber duck. This forces them to work through a problem aloud, which has proven time and time again to help people solve problems. So if a piece of text has your head spinning from trying to work through it by yourself, start chatting with your nearest friend/pet/rubber duck. You'll be surprised with how much easier it is to understand a text once you've talked it through with someone.



Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU

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