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Messages - mondal

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Create your Own Website / Re: Using WampServer for Local Development
« on: December 02, 2012, 05:49:32 PM »
Good to know about this basic idea about WAMP server.

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We may try this to lift DIU ranking, but of course in a proper way!

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Please go through the following e-mail for job and internship opportunities.

From: ICTHQ Information <info@icthq.org>
Date: Tue, Jun 19, 2012 at 4:27 PM
Subject: Job opportunity for Graduates, Interns and Students at ICT HeadQuarte​rs



Dear Sir,

This is here to inform you that, ICT HeadQuarters is searching for talented Jr. System Developer (Web), Sr. System Developer (application & software),Graphics & Multimedia Designer and Sr. Marketing executive. Those who have completed graduation, who want to do internship and also the students who are interested to involve with corporate industry earlier can apply for the jobs.

This can be mentioned that, ICT HeadQuarters (ICTHQ) is a growing ICT company in Bangladesh. And very soon is going to be authorized (already applied and accepted) by the Ministry of ICT, Bangladesh. We are highly involved with developing e-Development projects in Bangladesh to make an overall progress regarding automated and digital Bangladesh empowerment.

Here is the link where you can find the details of the job requirements and apply procedure: http://www.icthq.org/jobs-at-icthq

--
ICT HeadQuarters
ICTHQ Information Center

Promotion of ICT Business, Centrality of ICT
House #82, Road #03, Mohammadia Housing Society
Mohammadpur, Dhaka-1207, Bangladesh
Website: http://www.icthq.org/

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I must appreciate you for sharing such a meaningful lesson through this post. Our parents really work hard to make us successful and it is our duty to make them happy and proud...

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Thanks for sharing such a nice story full of lessons about life. We should follow this in our real life to live better.

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partially agree with you, in the era of modern world where things are rolling on and on so quickly.. technology is changing rapidly and life gives us little time to cope up with all this happenings..so I believe if someone has the ability to move fast
and knows how to use the brain for balancing surroundings,s/he will be succeeded. If we look around, we see so many people are doing very well in life due to their timely initiative and smart decision about career and life...whereas some are pulling it hard for a long to reach the same.   

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worthy post..we all need to practice this in our life to be a better person..

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agree with you, now a days people talks more and listen less...

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Hinduism / The Story of Radha-Krishna
« on: May 05, 2012, 02:44:29 PM »
The Radha-Krishna amour is a love legend of all times. It's indeed hard to miss the many legends and paintings illustrating Krishna's love affairs, of which the Radha-Krishna affair is the most memorable. Krishna's relationship with Radha, his favorite among the 'gopis' (cow-herding maidens), has served as a model for male and female love in a variety of art forms, and since the sixteenth century appears prominently as a motif in North Indian paintings. The allegorical love of Radha has found expression in some great Bengali poetical works of Govinda Das, Chaitanya Mahaprabhu, and Jayadeva the author of Geet Govinda.

Krishna's youthful dalliances with the 'gopis' are interpreted as symbolic of the loving interplay between God and the human soul. Radha's utterly rapturous love for Krishna and their relationship is often interpreted as the quest for union with the divine. This kind of love is of the highest form of devotion in Vaishnavism, and is symbolically represented as the bond between the wife and husband or beloved and lover.

Radha, daughter of Vrishabhanu, was the mistress of Krishna during that period of his life when he lived among the cowherds of Vrindavan. Since childhood they were close to each other - they played, they danced, they fought, they grew up together and wanted to be together forever, but the world pulled them apart. He departed to safeguard the virtues of truth, and she waited for him. He vanquished his enemies, became the king, and came to be worshipped as a lord of the universe. She waited for him. He married Rukmini and Satyabhama, raised a family, fought the great war of Ayodhya, and she still waited. So great was Radha's love for Krishna that even today her name is uttered whenever Krishna is refered to, and Krishna worship is though to be incomplete without the deification of Radha.
One day the two most talked about lovers come together for a final single meeting. Suradasa in his Radha-Krishna lyrics relates the various amorous delights of the union of Radha and Krishna in this ceremonious 'Gandharva' form of their wedding in front of five hundred and sixty million people of Vraj and all the gods and goddesses of heaven. The sage Vyasa refers to this as the 'Rasa'. Age after age, this evergreen love theme has engrossed poets, painters, musicians and all Krishna devotees alike.

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Hinduism / The Story of Savitri & Satyavan
« on: May 03, 2012, 06:47:33 PM »
Savitri was the beautiful daughter of a wise and powerful king. The fame of Savitri's beauty spread far and wide, but she refused to marry, saying that she would herself go out in the world and find a husband for herself. So the king chose the best warriors to protect her, and the princess wandered throughout the country searching for a prince of her choice.

One day she reached a dense forest, where dwelt a king who had lost his kingdom and fallen into his bad days. Old and blind he lived in a small hut with his wife and son. The son, who was a handsome young prince, was the sole comfort of his parents. He chopped wood and sold it in the countryside, and bought food for his parents, and they lived in love and happiness. Savitri was strongly drawn towards them, and she knew her search had come to an end. Savitri fell in love with the young prince, who was called Satyavan, and was known for his legendary generosity.

Hearing that Savitri has chosen a penniless prince, her father was heavily downcast. But Savitri was hell-bent on marrying Satyavan. The king consented, but a saint informed him that a fatal curse laid upon the young prince: He is doomed to die within a year. The king told her daughter about the curse and asked her to choose someone else. But Savitri refused, and stood firm in her determination to marry the same prince. The king finally agreed with a heavy heart.

The wedding of Savitri and Satyavan took place with a lot of fanfare, and the couple went back to the forest hut. For a whole year they lived happily. On the last day of the year, Savitri rose early and when Satyavan picked up his axe to go into the forest to chop wood she requested him to take her along, and the two went into the jungle.

Under a tall tree, he made a seat of soft green leaves and plucked flowers for her to weave into a garland while he chopped wood. Towards noon Satyavan felt a little tired, and after a while he came and lay down resting his head in Savitri's lap. Suddenly the whole forest grew dark, and soon Savitri saw a tall figure standing before her. It was Yama, the God of Death. "I have come to take your husband," said Yama, and looked down at Satyavan, as his soul left his body.
When Yama was about to leave, Savitri ran after him, and pleaded Yama to take her too along with him to the land of the dead or give back the life of Satyavan. Yama replied, "Your time has not yet come, child. Go back to your home." But Yama was ready to grant her any boon, except Satyavan's life. Savitri asked, "Let me have wonderful sons." "So be it", replied Yama. Then Savitri said, "But how can I have sons without my husband, Satyavan? Therefore I beg of you to give back his life." Yama had to give in! Satyavan's body came back to life. He slowly woke up from the stupor and the two gladly walked back to their hut.

So strong was the single-minded love and determination of Savitri that she chose a noble young man for her husband, knowing that he had only a year to live, married him with all confidence. Even the God of Death had to relent, and bowed to her love and devotion

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Hinduism / Shakuntala-Dushyant tale
« on: April 29, 2012, 04:44:56 PM »
The legend of the exquisitely beautiful Shakuntala and the mighty king Dushyant is a thrilling love story from the epic Mahabharata, which the great ancient poet Kalidasa retold in his immortal play Abhijnanashakuntalam.

While on a hunting trip, King Dushyant of the Puru dynasty meets the hermit-girl Shakuntala. They fall in love with each other and, in the absence of her father, Shakuntala weds the king in a ceremony of 'Ghandharva', a form of marriage by mutual consent with mother Nature as the witness. When the time comes for Dushyant to return to his palace, he promises to send an envoy to escort her to his castle. As a symbolic gesture he gives her a signet ring.
One day when the hotheaded hermit Durvasa stops at her hut for hospitality, Shakuntala, lost in her love thoughts, fails to hear the guest's calls. The temperamental sage turns back and curses her: "He whose thoughts have engrossed you would not remember you anymore." On the plea of her companions, the enraged sage relents and adds a condition to his curse-statement: "He can only recall you upon producing some significant souvenir."

Days roll by and nobody from the palace comes to fetch her. Her father sends her to the royal court for their reunion, as she was pregnant with Dushyant's child. En route, Shakuntala's signet-ring accidentally drops into the river and gets lost.

When Shakuntala presents herself before the king, Dushyant, under the spell of the curse, fails to acknowledge her as his wife. Heart-broken, she pleads to the gods to vanquish her from the face of earth. Her wish is granted. The spell is broken when a fisherman finds the signet ring in the guts of a fish - the same ring that Shakuntala had lost on her way to the court. The king suffers from an intense feeling of guilt and injustice. Shakuntala forgives Dushyant and they are reunited happily. She gives birth to a male child. He is called Bharat, after whom India gets her name.

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Congratulations to DIUDC Team and the Moderator  !! Wish better luck in future.

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Nutrition and Food Engineering / Re: Excess Salt- Can be dangerous!
« on: March 15, 2012, 12:49:00 PM »
thanks for sharing.. we should follow it...

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BBA Discussion Forum / Re: MBA major in Accounting
« on: December 24, 2011, 01:28:39 PM »
MBA Major in Accounting is under process of approval from UGC. Hopefully by next Semester (Summer-12) we would be able to introduce it.

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Hinduism / 4 Vedas in Brief
« on: December 13, 2011, 01:21:39 PM »

The Rig Veda: The Book of Mantra
The Rig Veda is a collection of inspired songs or hymns and is a main source of information on the Rig Vedic civilization. It is the oldest book in any Indo-European language and contains the earliest form of all Sanskrit mantras that date back to 1500 B.C. - 1000 B.C. Some scholars date the Rig Veda as early as 12000 BC - 4000 B.C. The Rig-Vedic ‘samhita’ or collection of mantras consists of 1,017 hymns or ‘suktas’, covering about 10,600 stanzas, divided into eight ‘astakas’ each having eight ‘adhayayas’ or chapters, which are sub-divided into various groups. The hymns are the work of many authors or seers called ‘rishis’. There are seven primary seers identified: Atri, Kanwa,Vashistha, Vishwamitra, Jamadagni, Gotama and Bharadwaja. The rig Veda accounts in detail the social, religious, political and economic background of the Rig-Vedic civilization. Even though monotheism characterizes some of the hymns of Rig Veda, naturalistic polytheism and monism can be discerned in the religion of the hymns of Rig Veda.

The Sama Veda, Yajur Veda and Atharva Veda were compiled after the age of the Rig Veda and are ascribed to the Vedic period.

The Sama Veda: The Book of Song
The Sama Veda is purely a liturgical collection of melodies (‘saman’). The hymns in the Sama Veda, used as musical notes, were almost completely drawn from the Rig Veda and have no distinctive lessons of their own. Hence, its text is a reduced version of the Rig Veda. As Vedic Scholar David Frawley puts it, if the Rig Veda is the word, Sama Veda is the song or the meaning, if Rig Veda is the knowledge, Sama Veda is its realization, if Rig Veda is the wife, the Sama Veda is her husband.

The Yajur Veda: The Book of Ritual
The Yajur Veda is also a liturgical collection and was made to meet the demands of a ceremonial religion. The Yajur Veda practically served as a guidebook for the priests who execute sacrificial acts muttering simultaneously the prose prayers and the sacrificial formulae (‘yajus’). It is similar to ancient Egypt’s “Book of the Dead”. There are no less than six complete recessions of Yajur Veda - Madyandina, Kanva, Taittiriya, Kathaka, Maitrayani and Kapishthala.


The Atharva Veda: The Book of Spell
The last of the Vedas, this is completely different from the other three Vedas and is next in importance to Rig-Veda with regard to history and sociology. A different spirit pervades this Veda. Its hymns are of a more diverse character than the Rig Veda and are also simpler in language. In fact, many scholars do not consider it part of the Vedas at all. The Atharva Veda consists of spells and charms prevalent at its time, and portrays a clearer picture of the Vedic society.

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