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Topics - fahmidasiddiqa

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When the climate conditions are not favorable for plant growth, we try to change this environment and make if appropriate for the culture. The most usual technique for this is building a greenhouse or tunnel lined with plastic or other material. Thus, we change the environment helping the plant to grow better. As a result, this environment has not only the appropriate soil, available water, but also a favorable climate. Regarding climate, it is important to remember the partial control we try to obtain on the temperature, light, air humidity and gas concentration on the environment.

Today, there are many options available in the market referring to types of structures and materials that may be used to cover these structures. However, all the materials used until now to protect the plants need some structure or support in order to avoid the contact of this material (plastic, screen etc.) with the plant, which represents an investment, generally with high cost.

Due to constant studies, we already have another material, which can change the climate conditions and may be placed directly over the plant without needing any support this is the "nonwoven" of polypropylene or Agrotextile.

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Weaving / Agro textiles - A New Alternative For Agriculture Protection
« on: April 06, 2019, 11:36:24 AM »
When the climate conditions are not favorable for plant growth, we try to change this environment and make if appropriate for the culture. The most usual technique for this is building a greenhouse or tunnel lined with plastic or other material. Thus, we change the environment helping the plant to grow better. As a result, this environment has not only the appropriate soil, available water, but also a favorable climate. Regarding climate, it is important to remember the partial control we try to obtain on the temperature, light, air humidity and gas concentration on the environment.


Today, there are many options available in the market referring to types of structures and materials that may be used to cover these structures. However, all the materials used until now to protect the plants need some structure or support in order to avoid the contact of this material (plastic, screen etc.) with the plant, which represents an investment, generally with high cost.

 

Due to constant studies, we already have another material, which can change the climate conditions and may be placed directly over the plant without needing any support this is the "nonwoven" of polypropylene or Agrotextile.

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Special Fabrics / SELF-CLEANING CLOTHES!!!
« on: March 24, 2019, 11:55:37 AM »
SELF-CLEANING CLOTHES

If you do the laundry for your family, self-cleaning clothes are probably at the top of your futuristic fashion wish list. And it may not be too long before this dream becomes a reality (kind-of).

Scientists claim tiny metal structures attached to cotton fibres can break down grime when exposed to sunlight. Researchers grew 3D copper and silver nanostructures on cotton thread, which was then woven into a piece of fabric.

When it was exposed to light, the nanostructures absorbed the energy, making the electronics in the metal atoms excited. This made grime on the surface of the fabric break down, cleaning itself in around six minutes.

Dr Rajesh Ramanathan, a materials engineer at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia, who led the research, said: 'There's more work to do before we can start throwing out our washing machines, but this advance lays a strong foundation for the future development of fully self-cleaning textiles.'

Good news... but will they tackle tomato ketchup and grass stains? Only time will tell.

This article is part of our Tech Innovation for the Future series, brought to you in association with Honor.

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Fabric Manufacturing / SELF-CLEANING CLOTHES!!!
« on: March 24, 2019, 11:53:42 AM »
SELF-CLEANING CLOTHES!

If you do the laundry for your family, self-cleaning clothes are probably at the top of your futuristic fashion wish list. And it may not be too long before this dream becomes a reality (kind-of).

Scientists claim tiny metal structures attached to cotton fibres can break down grime when exposed to sunlight. Researchers grew 3D copper and silver nanostructures on cotton thread, which was then woven into a piece of fabric.

When it was exposed to light, the nanostructures absorbed the energy, making the electronics in the metal atoms excited. This made grime on the surface of the fabric break down, cleaning itself in around six minutes.

Dr Rajesh Ramanathan, a materials engineer at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia, who led the research, said: 'There's more work to do before we can start throwing out our washing machines, but this advance lays a strong foundation for the future development of fully self-cleaning textiles.'

Good news... but will they tackle tomato ketchup and grass stains? Only time will tell.

This article is part of our Tech Innovation for the Future series, brought to you in association with Honor.

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Special Fabrics / COLOUR-CHANGING CLOTHES
« on: March 24, 2019, 11:49:50 AM »
COLOUR-CHANGING CLOTHES!!!

If you’ve ever turned up at an event only to find you’ve slightly misjudged the dress code, you might be glad of technology that helps you blend into your surroundings like a chameleon. Colour-changing clothes are on their way – and we don’t mean those dodgy Hypercolor t-shirts from the 1990s.

Designers have experimented with embedding LEDs and e-Ink screens in clothing and accessories with varying levels of success. For instance, a company named ShiftWear attracted a lot of attention with its concept trainers that could change pattern thanks to an embedded e-Ink screen and accompanying app. But they never took off.

Now, the College of Optics & Photonics at the University of Central Florida has announced the first user-controlled colour-changing fabric, which enables the wearer to change its colour using their smartphone.

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Special Fabrics / BUILT-IN SENSORS TO COLLECT MEDICAL DATA
« on: March 24, 2019, 11:48:42 AM »
BUILT-IN SENSORS TO COLLECT MEDICAL DATA!

You may have embraced wearing a fitness watch to collect data about your resting heartrate, fitness and sleep habits, but the same technology can also be built into clothes.
Omsignal has created activewear, workwear and sleepwear that collects a raft of medical-grade data without wearers noticing. Its bras, t-shirts and shirts are made using smart stretchy fabric with built-in strategically placed ECG, respiration and physical activity sensors.
The data collected by these sensors is sent to a recording module in the clothing, which then sends it to the Cloud. It can be accessed, analysed and viewed using an app to help people work out ways of staying calmer under pressure at work, or how to sleep more soundly. The recording module can collect data for 50 hours without the need to be recharged and is splash and sweat-resistant.


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Special Fabrics / WOVEN IN TOUCH SENSORS TO CONTROL A PHONE
« on: March 24, 2019, 11:46:19 AM »
WOVEN IN TOUCH SENSORS TO CONTROL A PHONE!!!

If you’re forever rummaging in your pocket or bag to see if you’ve got a text, this jacket might help. Levi’s Commuter Trucker Jacket is the first garment with Jacquard by Google woven in.
Tiny electronics contained in a flexible snap tag connect the Jacquard Threads in the jacket’s cuff to your phone. The snap tag on the inner cuff lets a user know about incoming information, such as a phone call, by flashing a light on the tag and by using haptic feedback to make it vibrate.
The tag also houses the battery, which can last up to two weeks between USB charges. Users can tap the tag to perform certain functions, brush their cuff to drop a pin to mark a favorite coffee shop and get haptic feedback when their Uber is arriving. It’s also possible to assign gestures in the accompanying app and change them easily.
The jacket is tailored with the urban cyclist in mind, perhaps tapping into the hipster image, and features articulated shoulders to provide extra room to manoeuvre, reflectors, and a dropped hem for modesty.


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Yarn Manufacturing / 15th Dhaka International yarn and fabric show 2019
« on: January 24, 2019, 10:06:49 AM »
15th Dhaka International yarn and fabric show 2019

The four-day 15th Dhaka International Yarn and Fabric Show-2019 (Winter Edition) began at the International Convention City (ICCB) in the capital on Wednesday. And our department is proudly participating with a number of fabulous projects.

Commerce Minister Tipu Munshi inaugurated the event organised by CEMS Global and the Sub-Council of Textile Industry (CCPIT TEX), China

Federation of Bangladesh Chambers of Commerce and Industry President Md Shafiul Islam, Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association President Md Siddiqur Rahman, Bangladesh Knitwear Manufacturers and Exporters Association first Vice-President Mansoor Ahmed, among others, were present.

Tipu Munshi lauded the private sector for coming forward to help Bangladesh be hunger and poverty-free. He said Bangladesh had already been recognized as a lower middle income country in the World Bank assessment.

“The per capita income is now $1,754. The contribution of the industrial sector to the national growth has been increasing. Considering purchasing power, Bangladesh is now the world’s 32nd largest economy,” he said.

Minister Tipu said 81.23% of the total revenue came from the garments sector in the last fiscal year. “The government is working relentlessly to generate more than $50 billion revenue annually from this sector by 2021,” he said.

A total of 370 international exhibitors from over 22 countries are presenting their up-to-date fabrics, which are ready-to-use for garment, accessories, industrial use and other various applications at the exhibition.

The expo is open for all from 10:30am to 7:30pm from January 23-26.

This year’s expo is taking place along with two concurrent exhibitions titled “3rd Dhaka International Denim Show 2019 - Winter Edition” and “35th Dye and Chem Bangladesh 2019 International Expo - Winter Edition” from January 23 to 26.

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Textile Engineering / Top 10 Textile Industry in Bangladesh
« on: September 12, 2018, 11:01:13 AM »
There are thousands of textile industry in Bangladesh. Some are members of BTMA (Bangladesh Textile Mills Association). And large number of textile industry are not registered BTMA. In this article a list of top ten textile industries in Bangladesh has been made. Really it is very tough task to take 10 industry names from more than thousands. In this list gave priority in capacity of production, number of total employees, working environments and overall contribution in economy of Bangladesh. mentioned only the group name. Because each group concerns of many factory. In this list Ha-meem group is not present because it is leading manufacturer of readymade garments. They have also textile industry but not huge.

1. Beximco Textile
Head Office :
Beximco Industrial Park
Sarabo, Kashimpur, Gazipur, Bangladesh .
Phone: +880-2-58611891, +880-2-58612040
Mobile : 01713-001659
Fax: +880-2-58613470, +880-2-9615523, 7701164
Telex : 675848 BXIM Bj
E-mail : sardar@beximtex.com
Website : www.bextex.net

2. Square Textile
Corporate Headquarter:
Square Center,
48 Mohakhali C/A Dhaka-1212, Bangladesh
Telephone: +880 2 8833047-56, 8859007
Fax: +880 2 8828768,
+880 2 8835021,
+880 2 8828609

Head Office:
Mascot Plaza (11-12th Floor) Plot-107/A,
Sector-7, Uttara
Dhaka-1230, Bangladesh
Telephone: +880 2 8963227,
8963547,8951101-7
Fax: + 880 2 8952652

3. Sinha Group
Head Office:
House# 368, Road#28, New DOHS, Mohakhali, Dhaka-1206
Tel: 8828860-64, 9891390-91
Fax: 88-2-8828856-7
Factory: Maximum Factories at Kanchpur-Rupgonj-Narayongonj,
AEPZ, Mirpur etc places.

4. Thermax Group
Corporate Head Office:
Green City Edge (12-14th Floor)
89 Kakrail C/A,
Dhaka – 1000, Bangladesh.
Phone: +88-02-9333274, +88-02-9359852
Fax: +88-02-9342526
E-Mail: headoffice@thermaxgroup.com

Business Office:
House # 93, Road # 25, Block#A
Banani, Dhaka – 1212, Bangladesh.
Phone: +88-02-8832808
Fax: +88-02-8833329
E-Mail: info@adury.com
Website: http://www.thermaxgroup.com

5. Noman Group
Marketing Office
House 19, Road 44, Gulshan 2, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Telephone: (+88 02) 9852906 | Email: demo@nttml.com
Corporate Headquarters
Adamjee Court Main Building (5th, 4th,3rd Floor)
115-120, Motijheel C/A,
Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh
Telephone: (+88 02) 7176207-8
Website: http://www.nomangroup.com/

6. DBL Group
Corporate Office:
23/1 Panthapath Link Road
BGMEA Complex, Kawran Bazar
Dhaka - 1215, Bangladesh
Telephone No: +880-2-8140367 - 74
Fax No: + 880-2-8140214
E-mail: info@dbl-group.com
Website URL: www.dbl-group.com/

7. Fakir Group
A-142-145 BSCIC Industrial Estate,
Fatullah, Narayanganj, Bangladesh.
Contact : +88 02 7671300 , 7671684, 7671685, 7672660,7672661
Fax: +88 02 7671301

8. Viyellatex Group
Corporate Office
Le Méridien Building (6th Floor)
79/A Commercial Area,
Airport Road, Nikunja 2,
Dhaka 1229.
Phone : 8802 9813001-10, 8801777777598
Fax : 8802 9811400
Email : info@viyellatexgroup.com
Website: https://www.viyellatexgroup.com/

9. Knit Concern Group
Location Address
62 Water Works Road,
Godnail, Narayangong – 1400,
Bangladesh
Contact Person:
Jahangir Alam
Managing Director
Knit Concern Group
E-mail : jahangir@knitconcern.com
Phone: 02 7631086, 02 7645641
Fax: 02-7641087
Email: info@knitconcern.com
Web: www.knitconcern.com

10. Sunman Group
Address: CDA Anx Building, 5th Floor,
S.S. Khaled Road, Kotowali Carcel, Chittagong

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Textile Engineering / FIFA Worldcup jerseys & Bangladesh!!!
« on: May 10, 2018, 09:28:58 AM »
Bangladesh has become a lucrative destination for sports jerseys for its price competitiveness, exporters said.
The sector for jerseys and specialised sports garments, a knitwear sub-category, has abundant work orders as demand for jerseys is on the rise with mega sports events taking place all year round.
Bangladesh sells a single jersey for $5 to $6. Bangladeshi manufacturers export jerseys to brands like Nike, Puma, Adidas, G-Star, H&M and M&S. At least 20 factories in Bangladesh have exported jerseys for the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil.
Bangladesh does not supply football players' jerseys; the country mainly exports T-shirts and jerseys for spectators and supporters of different teams during big sports events globally
The prospect of sports garment business is bright, as many retailers are still placing work orders in Bangladesh. At the same time, manufacturers also need to maintain standards of the products strictly.
David Hasanat, managing director of Viyellatex Group, said: “Sports garment items have become a part of fashion now.” Viyellatex also sent a few million pieces of jerseys to countries like Brazil and Argentina on the eve of World Cup, he said, adding that Bangladesh has a good share in the global sports garment business.
DBL Group and Epyllion Group supplied eight million pieces of jerseys during the last FIFA World Cup, officials said.
Bangladesh exported knitwear worth $9.8 billion and woven garments worth $10.16 billion during July-April this fiscal year -- respectively 16.96 percent and 13.91 percent higher than those in the same period last fiscal year, according to Export Promotion Bureau.

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Textile Engineering / The Textile Industry
« on: May 08, 2018, 09:00:06 AM »
The Textile Industry
Did you know that industry leaders are looking to create ''anti-counterfeiting'' technology so that off-brand clothing manufacturers will no longer be able to perfectly replicate valuable pieces? Instead, the products will have a specific DNA that will make it completely unique. This technology was created to counter the replication fraud that is rampant in the market, especially for high fashion. This is just one of many new technological advances in the textile industry. We'll look at many more advances in textile production, but first, let's review the basics of the industry.

The textile industry is a global industry. The textile materials are made from fiber, yarns, and fabrics. Due to the variety of materials, textiles can be found in anything from high fashion to the air filters in your vacuum cleaner. This means that this industry is one of the largest in the world and employs millions of people. While the textile industry's focus was originally on the end product, countries have recently started to focus on the science and technology sides of textiles. The ability of a country to create new machines and technology gives its manufacturers an even larger share of this market, which, in turn, makes them more money.

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Textile Engineering / Performance of woven fabrics containing spandex
« on: November 26, 2016, 04:48:41 PM »
Spandex yarn increases the elongation of the stretch fabrics depending on the direction of the elasticity in the fabric and also enhances the crease recovery of the cotton and blend stretch fabrics, aver Yasser M E Hassan , Ahmed EL-Salmawy, and Alsaid A Almetwally.

Spandex (also known as elastane) is a manufactured fibre in which the fibre-forming substance is a long chain synthetic elastomer consisting of at least 85% by weight of segmented polyurethane. While many different soft-segmented chemistries for spandex have been evaluated over the years, only polyether and polyester chemistries remain in use today. Also for major commercial spinning processes (solution dry spinning, solution wet spinning, reaction spinning, and melt spinning) for spandex have been practiced over the last 30 years. The various processes yield fibres with distinctively different attributes including cross-sectional geometry and stress-strain properties

Today there are many spandex producers all over the world and several brands, types and costs of spandex in the market. The main types of spandex yarns that are used in weaving and knitting machines together with other yarns are bare, single-covered, double-covered, core-spun, and core plies yarns. Each form of spandex properly used, provides for a high elasticity in fabric.

Various previous studied have reported the physical and chemical properties of spandex fibres. An elastic fibre has been characterised by high breaking elongation (exceeding 100% and generally 50 to 800%), a low modulus of elasticity (approximately 1/1000 that of a conventional "Hard” fibre, such as nylon, cotton, and so on) and both a high degree and a high rate of recovery from 100% stretching (about 95%). Spandex fibres are resistant to hydrolysis (Lycra had power retention of 100% after boiling for 1 hour in water at pH 3 to 11). In addition the spandex fibres have good resistance to ultraviolet radiation, oxygen, heat, and oil.

Fabrics containing spandex yarn have a wide application value, especially because of their increased extensibility, elasticity, high degree of recovery, good dimensional stability, and simple care[11,12,13]. In apparel industry, these kinds of fabrics are used for sport cloths, and leisure cloths, hosiery, underwear and swimwear, so therefore for body-confirming garment which ensure stable shape under loading during wearing.

The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of randomly selected woven fabrics from the market, which containing spandex. Fabric breaking load in two directions, ie, warp and weft direction, and crease resistance were considered the most important properties that must be found in spandex fabrics. Fabric breaking load and elongation versus the drawing ratio will also be investigated.

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Textile Engineering / laser printing technology
« on: December 14, 2014, 03:17:24 PM »
This invention relates to methods of uniform color fading, fading with patterns and marking patterns onto textiles materials, such as denim, using lasers. More particularly, it relates to using lasers to simulate conventional laundering techniques, such as stone washing, echo ball washing and acid washing without the use of water or chemicals. Still more particularly, it relates to performing the above mentioned process in an environmentally safe manner.

Different methods of laser printing
Still other methods include the use of laser radiation to heat the textile to allow for better adhesion by the dyes. The prior patented art includes some methods for using a laser to mark various items, including textiles, but most require the use of wet dye solutions and none is like the present invention. There are a number of methods for marking
•   a method of laser marking which requires that a pigment coating be placed on the surface of the article being marked. Then a focused laser beam is used to affect the internal molecular structure of the pigment to change color.

•   a method and device for the recording of pictures by laser which requires several layers of material be placed on a substrate. A laser beam is used to ablate the top material to form an image.

•   a method for transferring a still image onto a substrate that is carbonizeable or discolorable. Unlike the present invention, this technique engraves a pattern into the substrate to form a pattern of some depth.

•   a process for manufacturing textile materials using lasers. In this method, a laser beam is used to cause a physical change in the textile material. This change, due to charring and burning effects, results in a larger cross-sectional area being exposed to the dyeing process. The larger cross section of the textile results in better dye adhesiveness.

•   A method involves using a laser beam to print a pattern on textile fabrics that is wet with dye. This latter method creates a pattern on the material by changing the color of the dye. Thus, a need exists for a method for marking various detailed patterns on colored textile fabrics without damaging the fabrics.
Unlike the above patents, the present invention uses an environmentally safe method for marking, fading and treating textile fabrics with a laser without the need for conventional washing methods, wet dyes, or excessive amounts of water.

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Production at minimum 60 garment factories in Gazipur and Ashulia was suspended for today, after workers clashed with law enforcers in the morning.
Of the total, 35 units were shut in Gazipur while the rest in Ashulia, on the outskirts of the capital.At least 45 workers sustained minor injuries during clashes, reports our correspondents.
The workers of Gazipur were demanding immediate reopening of their units, which remain shut since last month following a labour unrest over salary.On the other hand, the labourers of Ashulia were demonstrating for Tk 8,114 as monthly minimum wage.
The workers set fire to a factory building and a kitchen market in Gazipur Sadar upazila and vandalised two vehicles in Ashulia.

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Textile Engineering / Changes in Sportswear technology
« on: November 17, 2013, 05:49:31 PM »
Historically, natural fibres like wool, cotton and silk have been used in the manufacture of clothing. All of these fabrics have served us well in the past but they are now being improved upon particularly with regards to sports clothes.
We are now better able to manage our personal environments (keep cool, warm, dry) with modern fabrics.
The sportswear base layer is where the most interesting technological developments are occurring at the moment. Below are some of the more interesting new sportswear technologies on the market:
1.   Nike Sphere React – manages your personal environment keeping you cool if you are getting hot, and warm if you are too cold. It also keeps you dry.
2.   Skins – compression garments which are designed to improve performance in just about any athletic sport. Skins fit very snugly round the body and with their gradient compression technology they compress the muscles in key areas and reduce the build up of lactic acid, reducing fatigue, improving performance, keeping you cool, dry and reducing recovery time. All these impressive claims are backed up with independent scientific research.
3.   Nike Pro – Nike's own sports gear compression range
4.   Odour free technology there are also fabrics coming on the market that do not take in odour they therefore do not allow bacteria to breed and do not retain bad smells. This technology has some way to go before it becomes the norm but certainly a future where all your sports clothes smell freshly washed even after a hard game is not that far away.
In conclusion, sports clothing technology has moved on significantly in the last few years. Fabrics now exist that are proven to keep us warm, dry, cool, improve our performance, help us recover quicker and even smell better. Progress indeed – make the most of it!

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