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Messages - Raisa

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17
Economic, Social impact / Re: Tourism Economic Impact
« on: August 17, 2019, 12:25:31 PM »
 :)

18
Tourism Concept / Re: Tourism and Terrorism
« on: August 17, 2019, 12:25:23 PM »
 :)

21
Fire and Safety / Re: A Fire Next Door
« on: August 06, 2019, 03:19:41 PM »
 :) :) :)

22
thanks for the post

23
Teaching and Learning Tools / Re: Rubrics System
« on: July 16, 2019, 03:38:40 PM »
thanks for the post

24
Color theory / Re: Basic Color Theory
« on: July 16, 2019, 03:38:20 PM »
thanks for the post

25
Interior Design / Re: D&AD Festival 2019
« on: July 16, 2019, 03:38:07 PM »
thanks for the post

26
Interior Design / Re: Integrating Life and Work in the AEC World
« on: July 16, 2019, 03:37:59 PM »
thanks for the post

27
Interior Design / Re: Feldman Architecture Completes dosa by DOSA
« on: July 16, 2019, 03:37:51 PM »
thanks for the post

28
Interior Design / Re: Radical Innovation Award 2019
« on: July 16, 2019, 03:37:43 PM »
thanks for the post

29
Research Ideas / How to write a research methodology
« on: July 10, 2019, 12:41:52 PM »
n your thesis or dissertation, you will have to discuss the methods you used to do you research. The methodology or methods section explains what you did and how you did it, allowing readers to evaluate the reliability and validity of the research. It should include:

The type of research you did
How you collected and/or selected your data
How you analyzed your data
Any tools or materials you used in the research
Your rationale for choosing these methods
The methodology section should generally be written in the past tense.
Step 1: Explain your methodological approach
Begin by introducing your overall approach to the research. What research problem or question did you investigate, and what kind of data did you need to answer it?

Quantitative methods (e.g. surveys) are best for measuring, ranking, categorizing, identifying patterns and making generalizations
Qualitative methods (e.g. interviews) are best for describing, interpreting, contextualizing, and gaining in-depth insight into specific concepts or phenomena
Mixed methods allow for a combination of numerical measurement and in-depth exploration
Depending on your discipline and approach, you might also begin with a discussion of the rationale and assumptions underpinning your methodology.

Was your aim to address a practical or a theoretical research problem?
Why is this the most suitable approach to answering your research questions?
Is this a standard methodology in your field or does it require justification?
Were there any ethical or philosophical considerations?
What are the criteria for validity and reliability in this type of research?
In a quantitative experimental study, you might aim to produce generalizable knowledge about the causes of a phenomenon. Valid research requires a carefully designed study with controlled variables that can be replicated by other researchers.

In a qualitative ethnographic case study, you might aim to produce contextual real-world knowledge about the behaviors, social structures and shared beliefs of a specific group of people. As this methodology is less controlled and more interpretive, you will need to reflect on your position as researcher, taking into account how your participation and perception might have influenced the results.

Step 2: Describe your methods of data collection
Once you have introduced your overall methodological approach, you should give full details of the methods you used to conduct the research. Outline the tools, procedures and materials you used to gather data, and the criteria you used to select participants or sources.

Quantitative methods
 Surveys
Describe where, when and how the survey was conducted.

How did you design the questions and what form did they take (e.g. multiple choice, rating scale)?
How did you find and select participants?
Did you conduct surveys by phone, mail, online or in person, and how long did participants have to respond?
What was the sample size and response rate?
You might want to include the full questionnaire as an appendix so that your reader can see exactly what data was collected.

 Experiments
Give full details of the tools, techniques and procedures you used to conduct the experiment.

How did you design the experiment (e.g. between-subjects or within-subjects)?
How did you find and select participants?
What tools or technologies did you use in the experiment?
In experimental research, it is especially important to give enough detail for another researcher to reproduce your results.

 Existing data
Explain how you gathered and selected material (such as publications or archival data) for inclusion in your analysis.

Where did you source the material?
How was the data originally produced?
What criteria did you use to select material (e.g. date range)?
Quantitative methods example
The survey consisted of 5 multiple-choice questions and 10 questions that the respondents had to answer with a 7-point Lickert scale. The aim was to conduct the survey with 350 customers of Company X on the company premises in The Hague from 4-8 July 2017 between 11:00 and 15:00. A customer was defined as a person who had purchased a product from Company X on the day of questioning. Participants were given 5 minutes to fill in the survey anonymously, and 408 customers responded. Because not all surveys were fully completed, 371 survey results were included in the analysis.

Qualitative methods
 Interviews or focus groups
Describe where, when and how the interviews were conducted.

How did you find and select participants?
How many people took part?
What form did the interviews take (structured, semi-structured, unstructured)?
How long were the interviews and how were they recorded?
 Participant observation
Describe where, when and how you conducted the observation.

What group or community did you observe and how did you gain access to them?
How long did you spend conducting the research and where was it located?
How did you record your data (e.g. audiovisual recordings, note-taking)?
 Existing data
Explain how you selected case study materials (such as texts or images) for the focus of your analysis.

What type of materials did you analyze?
How did you collect and select them?
Qualitative methods example
In order to gain a better insight into the possibilities for improvement of the product range, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 8 returning customers from the main target group of Company X. A returning customer was defined as someone who usually bought products at least twice a week from Company X. The surveys were used to select participants who belonged to the target group (20-45 years old). Interviews were conducted in a small office next to the cash register, and lasted approximately 20 minutes each. Answers were recorded by note-taking, and seven interviews were also filmed with consent. One interviewee preferred not to be filmed.
source : https://www.scribbr.com/dissertation/methodology/

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