Why do teachers leave?

Author Topic: Why do teachers leave?  (Read 3988 times)

Offline goodboy

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Re: Why do teachers leave?
« Reply #15 on: October 28, 2010, 09:28:09 PM »
 :)Shibli sir,

I'm very happy to be a student of your class. & Really you said the right thing.

As I saw & realized, our university is the best from all. Because we have the potential to mark the topr place by delivering the best shots.

Shajib
101-11-1375
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Md. Abul Hossain Shajib.
101-11-1375
Department of BBA, Sec:B.
25th Batch.
Daffodil International University.
Email: shajib_1375@diu.edu.bd
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Offline shibli

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Re: Why do teachers leave?
« Reply #16 on: June 22, 2011, 10:44:52 AM »
We should not run away form the country for good life or elsewhere. It never pays, we will be uprooting ourselves from our own root. Life abroad! We will be treated there as an alien--or at best a second class citizen. Things are getting tougher because of religion and color and skin. The country has given us a lot. Now it's our turn to give something to the country, our people.
Those who worship the natural elements enter darkness (Air, Water, Fire, etc.). Those who worship sambhuti sink deeper in darkness. [Yajurveda 40:9]; Sambhuti means created things, for example table, chair, idol, etc.

Offline ovi.live

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Re: Why do teachers leave?
« Reply #17 on: July 05, 2011, 03:33:22 PM »
its very important problem..!

Offline shibli

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We have failed to teach our students to love their motherland!
« Reply #18 on: July 09, 2011, 01:12:24 PM »
"We have failed to teach our students to love their motherland."
- – Dr Muhammed Zafar Iqbal

TS: Recently undergrad engineering students are showing a tendency to leave the country and settle down abroad for higher studies or job opportunities. Are our universities incapable of facilitating Master or PhD level research work?

MZI: Obviously our universities are capable of conducting Masters and PhD level research work, many universities are conducting such projects. Engineering students moving abroad for higher studies is more about preference. It's not that we are not capable of providing the facilities of a standard research work; these are bright students and they might feel they can go and study anywhere in the world.

It is a continuous outflow. If you survey, you will find out how many students are serving their own country and how many are serving others. You might even find 99 percent students of some major universities in Bangladesh are leaving the country to serve others.

Students often complain about lack of resources and funding as a major reason for moving abroad for Master or PhD level works. Do you think it is a legitimate reason?

No, I don't think it's a valid reason. We somehow have failed to make our students feel for their motherland. We have failed to make them realise that they have responsibilities towards their own country. Our students study with the money earned by the poor people of this country, but they do not feel like returning the favour by serving the nation that fed them. They just go abroad and work there. It's become a trend now. The brightest minds of the country are leaving her.

If resource and funding were the major motivations or key to success for research works, then Saudi Arabia would have been the most technologically advanced country in the world. But it is not. In engineering, there are other factors actively influencing; there is passion, sincerity, patriotism and etc.

We, as a university or an authority, have our limitations. We have faculty crisis. As the department head and senior-most professor I am not supposed to take any courses but last semester I ended up teaching six courses, which is a lot of pressure. Most of the teachers in my university are recent graduates and my students; they are very young. Being young is actually a good thing but if I had five or six professors, I could have designed the department differently. Being young and recently graduate, the present teachers are sent abroad for PhDs, so that they can come back as professors. But this process creates a faculty crisis. Limited funding is another reason for this faculty crisis. Where BUET has 45-48 teachers in their CSC department, we have only 15 in ours. So you can tell the difference.

Yes, our laboratories are not as good as that of MIT, but ours is better than a Bangladeshi private university; in comparison to other public universities, it's quite good as well.

Students sometimes compare their classroom lectures to that of MIT or IIT. Don't you think we lag behind in terms of upgraded and technologically attractive classroom lectures or activities?

The subcontinent has witnessed a Bose, who, without any kind of technological support, co-invented the very famous Bose-Einstein theory. It doesn't actually matter whether a student is taught with a high-end video projector or just with a piece of chalk and blackboard.

Suppose you are a computer science student; all you need for your work is a computer and that's it. The brightest of my students are mostly from average or under-privileged backgrounds. Still, with their passion and devotion towards the subject, they are excelling at their field. I have students who have been offered lucrative jobs from Google, yet they denied those jobs just to serve their own country.

Another common complaint among the students is teaching proficiency. Do you agree with that?

Nothing can be purely good. There are good teachers and there are bad teachers. I have had both in my life. But many of my contemporary students and I have come out of that circle and found our own way of educating ourselves. And it's not true that all the teachers abroad are very good. I have studied abroad. I have been taught by some of the most excellent researchers and scientists. But being an excellent scientist doesn't make one a good teacher. Those great scientists who took my class often used to forget what they were teaching. So if one has a bad teacher s/he just has to improvise, take help from books and internet and educate oneself. I have done it, many students are doing it.

Bangladesh hardly has engineering industries. Can Bangladesh provide adequate job opportunities to our engineers? Isn't job satisfaction one of the reasons that engineers are moving abroad?
Engineering students often complain about the lack of facilities, instead of completely utilising the resources they have. Photo: AANTAKI RAISA

Only recently our economy has started to flourish; our GDP has increased. Until then, our very own survival was at stake. Our economy was completely dependent on agriculture. Only recently we have moved to this engineering industry. The only heavy industry I have seen is the ship-building industry. The other engineering industry that can flourish here is the software industry. Recently, many international companies are asking for thousands of software engineers from Bangladesh; unfortunately, we have failed to provide such large number of engineers!

These engineering-related industries need foreign investment. As most of the industries are hugely mechanised, they hardly require human workers.

Students have to focus on the industries which have scopes in Bangladesh. We have to teach the students how they can help the nation to develop. Even if a student chooses to work on something that doesn't have any scope in Bangladesh now, s/he should go abroad, acquire the knowledge, come back to the country and start a new arena with his or her expertise. But, what we are observing is, the students are leaving the country, getting a job abroad, applying for immigration, taking their families along, and never coming back.

The immigrant workers who are working abroad are earning us millions of foreign currency; our economy is greatly boosted by their income. But the very brightest minds of ours aren't contributing to our economy. Our engineers are studying abroad, publishing papers, doing great at their jobs and at best, letting the world know how marvelous the students of Bangladesh are. The migrant workers, who we do not even care about, are boosting our economy on a much larger scale than the brightest minds of the countries are.

You mentioned that we failed to provide efficient engineers when foreign investors wanted. Why do you think we are not producing enough efficient engineers?
Technologically rich laboratories are prerequisites to standard engineering education. Photo: AANTAKI RAISA

First of all, let me tell you, our engineering students aren't studying this subject because they love engineering or want to become engineers. They are studying it because they want jobs. Same goes for our medical students; they want money, they don't want to become doctors. If you ask a bright child what s/he wants to become, most probably s/he would answer- a scientist; because science is interesting and it's fun. But that child's parents wouldn't let him or her become a scientist. They'd pressure her or him to be an engineer. That child's dream is torn apart at the very root, just like that. But science and engineering are not the same thing. Science is much more interesting because it is science; and engineering is more about implementation, application and calculation. Unless you really have the passion, you wouldn't be good at it. So, when you force a student who wants to be a scientist to be an engineer, you put a lot of pressure on him or her. Thus, subject selection is faulty from the beginning.

There was a time when the telecommunication market was booming in Bangladesh and everyone was taking admission in communication engineering. Now the market is saturated and students are moving to computer science. And if a student fails to get admission in computer science s/he thinks her or his life is over. These are some very vital issues for an engineering student.

For my department, 30 students compete for one seat in an admission test. So those who get admission in this institution are the sharpest minds out of the 16 crore people in Bangladesh. Still, I have students who fail in courses, who barely pass. It's definitely not because they are not intelligent enough, it's because they aren't simply interested in the subject matter. But those who have come here out of their passion for the subject are doing so well that Google is competing to recruit them for their own company.

Then there are other problems that are inherent to Bangladesh. Political unrest, students' involvement in politics often hampers their education. Still, I think all of it is part of the training, part of life. I had a student who used to do all the cultural activities, who even joined political rallies, yet was an excellent student. So, you just have to accept the reality and move forth.

With the current job opportunities at the engineering sector, if a student wants to stay home and do something substantial, don't you think s/he will have to start a revolution?

I wouldn't go for a revolution. It's true our engineering industry is not that robust. But, the software industry has a great possibility here. What happens is that, software industries look for a large number of engineers which we fail to provide. Every year eight to nine thousand students graduate from computer science; of them only 200-400 students are usable. All others fail in interviews and are inefficient students. It's probably because we couldn't train them well or they didn't study hard. So, what we can do is train our students whenever and however they require. I once was asked to rank the engineering universities according to their quality. But I don't think it's of any use. Rather, if we can find a way to evaluate the engineering students individually and find out their flaws and train them in that particular area, we can actually produce more and better engineers. I had proposed such an evaluation method (called 'IT Professional Evaluation' or something like that) during the caretaker government's regime. But later, somehow, the proposal was cancelled. But this sort of training according to the need of a student could have helped them in being professionals.

You are one of those Bangladeshis who left a comfortable life abroad to serve their own country. What inspired you to take that risk?

If you think I took a risk, then you entirely misunderstood why I came back. I came back to do something for my own country; there is no risk in it! When I was abroad, yes I earned well, I had a comfortable life, but I had no satisfaction. I used to think what I was doing; and I saw I was doing nothing to help the country that has created me. That's the reason I came back. The satisfaction I get in making a good midterm question, is much higher than that I get when my paper is published. When I conduct an exam under all the political unrest, I feel I have done something for my country.

http://www.thedailystar.net/magazine/2011/05/03/education.htm
 
Those who worship the natural elements enter darkness (Air, Water, Fire, etc.). Those who worship sambhuti sink deeper in darkness. [Yajurveda 40:9]; Sambhuti means created things, for example table, chair, idol, etc.

Offline sethy

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Re: Why do teachers leave?
« Reply #19 on: August 03, 2011, 02:44:35 PM »
I think those teacher read this topic they can not leave diu as well us.
Sazia Afrin Sethy
ID:101-11-1366
BBA Department,
Batch: 25th,
Sec: B.

Offline sethy

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Re: Why do teachers leave?
« Reply #20 on: August 06, 2011, 11:37:12 PM »
I think the ratio become decreases.
Sazia Afrin Sethy
ID:101-11-1366
BBA Department,
Batch: 25th,
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Offline Golam Kibria

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Re: Why do teachers leave?
« Reply #21 on: August 08, 2011, 12:53:47 PM »
Our university teachers are very much sincere and our university provides them the best facility .So I think, if they love us and our university, they cannot leave us and our university.
Golam Kibria
ID:101-11-1373 (BBA)
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Ex.Lecturer,SEBGC
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