A Few Native English Idioms

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Offline Antara11

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Re: A Few Native English Idioms
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2015, 04:41:59 PM »
16. (To) Look like a million dollars/bucks:

Wouldn’t it be great if we really could look like a million dollars? We’d be rich, but that’s not the case. If someone tells you that you look like a million bucks, you should take it as a huge compliment because it means you look absolutely fabulous and really attractive.

While sometimes we use this English idiom for guys, it’s more commonly used to compliment females. And while some of your female friends may look beautiful every day, you should save this English idiom for when they’ve really made an effort and it’s a special occasion, like prom or a wedding.

“Wow, Mary, you look like a million dollars/bucks this evening. I love your dress!”
Antara Basak
Senior Lecturer
Dept. of English

Offline Antara11

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Re: A Few Native English Idioms
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2015, 04:42:14 PM »
17. (To) Cut to the chase

When somebody tells you to cut to the chase it means that you’ve been talking too long and haven’t gotten to the point. When a person uses this idiom, they are telling you to hurry up and get the important part, without all the details. Be careful how you use this idiom, because if used while talking to someone like a college professor or your boss, it’s rude and disrespectful.

If you’re speaking to a group of people, like your employees, and say I’m going to cut to the chase, it means that there are a few things that need to be said but there’s very little time, so you’ll skip to the important parts so everyone understands.

“Hi guys, as we don’t have much time here, so I’m going to cut to the chase. We’ve been having some major problems in the office lately.”
Antara Basak
Senior Lecturer
Dept. of English

Offline Antara11

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Re: A Few Native English Idioms
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2015, 04:42:28 PM »
18. (To) Find your feet

Is it possible to lose your feet? No way, they’re attached to your body! So what does it mean when somebody says they’re trying to find their feet? If you find yourself in a new situation, for example living in a new country and having to get used to a new college, you could say I’m still finding my feet. It means that you’re still adjusting and getting used to the new environment.

“Lee, how’s your son doing in America?”

“He’s doing okay. He’s learned where the college is but is still finding his feet with everything else. I guess it’ll take time for him to get used to it all.”
Antara Basak
Senior Lecturer
Dept. of English

Offline Antara11

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Re: A Few Native English Idioms
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2015, 04:42:45 PM »
19. (To) Get over something:

If you think about it, it’s possible to literally get over something, for example get over a fence—but this is not how the phrase is generally used in the English language.

Imagine having a really difficult time, like breaking up with your girlfriend or boyfriend—it’s hard. But eventually once time passes and you no longer think about your ex, it means that you’ve gotten over him/her, you no longer worry about it and it no longer affects you in a negative way. It’s also possible to get over an illness too, which would mean that you’ve fully recovered.

“How’s Paula? Has she gotten over the death of her dog yet?”

“I think so. She’s already talking about getting a new one.”
Antara Basak
Senior Lecturer
Dept. of English

Offline Antara11

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Re: A Few Native English Idioms
« Reply #19 on: November 25, 2015, 04:43:07 PM »
20. (To) Keep your chin up

Did you just have a massive fight with your friend? Did you fail your English finals? Did your team lose the final match? Did you lose your job? If you answered “yes” to any of the questions, then you’re probably feeling sad and a little depressed, right?

In this situation, a supportive friend might tell you to keep your chin up. When they tell you this, they’re showing their support for you, and it’s a way of saying “stay strong,” you’ll get through this. Don’t let these things affect you too badly.

“Hey, Keiren, have you had any luck finding work yet?”

“No, nothing, it’s really depressing, there’s nothing out there!”

“Don’t worry, you’ll find something soon, keep your chin up buddy and don’t stress.”

If you’re really serious about learning English well and finding your feet with the language abroad, make sure you spend some time focusing on English idioms to make your transition and easier one. Good Luck and keep your chin up!
Antara Basak
Senior Lecturer
Dept. of English

Offline Afroza Akhter Tina

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Re: A Few Native English Idioms
« Reply #20 on: November 25, 2015, 05:30:34 PM »
Interesting to know  :)




Afroza Akhter Tina
Senior Lecturer
Department of English, DIU