Adaptations of Shakespearean plays

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Offline irina

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Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« on: March 03, 2016, 10:59:14 AM »
Cymbeline
 An adaptation of one of Shakespeare's lesser-known plays, the action has been moved to modern-day New York and stars Ethan Hawke, Milla Jovovich, Penn Badgley and Ed Harris as Cymbeline. The trailer can be seen here and shows "a grudge war between corrupt cops and a drug-dealing biker gang in modern America". It will hit cinemas later this year.
Macbeth
 Recent Oscar nominee Michael Fassbender takes on lead duties while Marion Cotillard, replacing Natalie Portman, will be his devious wife. To make matters even more promising, it's being directed by Justin Kurzel, who wrote and directed the harrowing crime thriller Snowtown. It's also been picked up by the Weinsteins which means it's likely to get a hefty push for Oscars.
Enemy Of Man
Yet another Macbeth adaptation here but taking a slightly less traditional view of the material. According to the sourse this one will be "stripping back the dialogue and cranking up the action" which should prove interesting. It stars Sean Bean, Rupert Grint, James D'Arcy and Charles Dance and looks like it will take place largely on the battlefield. It'll be directed by actor Vincent Regan, who has starred in 300 and Snow White and the Huntsman.
Rosaline
After the slightly underwhelming performance of the last incarnation of Romeo & Juliet, starring Hailee Stanfield, this alternate take hopes to do a whole load better. It's set to star Alison Williams, that's Marnie in Girls, as the titular character, better known as Romeo's jilted love and the cousin of Juliet. We then see the classic tragedy through her eyes. It'll be a comedic take and despite being set in the correct time, it'll use modern language. Dave Franco and Lily Collins are  to take  the roles of the doomed lovers.
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« Last Edit: March 03, 2016, 11:01:37 AM by irina »

Offline Afroza Akhter Tina

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Re: Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2016, 08:28:52 AM »
...pleasure to read more and more about Shakespeare these days as the world is specially celebrating the author this time.




Afroza Akhter Tina
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Department of English, DIU

Offline Shampa Iftakhar

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Re: Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2016, 11:49:54 AM »
Thanks for sharing :)

Offline fatema_diu

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Re: Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2016, 09:31:50 AM »
WAS LOOKING FOR SOME OF THE ADAPTATIONS OF SHAKESPEARE.
THANK YIUY

Offline irina

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Re: Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2016, 02:48:52 PM »
 Hope you will enjoy reading the matters :)

 West Side Story (1961)
Based on: Romeo and Juliet

One of the earliest and most famous versions of this phenomenon, West Side Story moves Romeo and Juliet to Manhattan's Upper West Side in the '50s, using belted-out solos and bright dance numbers instead of soliloquies. In place of the original play's Capulet-Montague family feud,West Side Story offers the Sharks and the Jets — two rival gangs spawned from the era's ethnic conflicts and strange obsession with juvenile delinquents — to separate the star-crossed lovers.
Ran (1985)
Based on: King Lear

Akira Kurosawa's late masterpiece retells King Lear's story in Japan's warlord era, and replaces the play's three daughters with three sons. At the beginning of the film, the old warlord divides his kingdom among his sons, only to see two of them turn against him (though the third sticks by his side). Ran sticks to the thematic issues of King Lear and mimics the addiction to pride and power that ultimately led to Lear's downfall. Both versions also have equally bloody endings — spoiler alert! — with all three kids, as well as dad, killed after a climactic battle sequence.
My Own Private Idaho (1991)
Based on: Henry IV and Henry V

Gus Van Sant's 1991 film loosely borrows from Henry IV and Henry V, with Keanu Reeves playing the Prince Hal role. This time, instead of boozing and avoiding his princely responsibilities, Reeves' character works as a hustler while waiting to inherit his father's fortune when he turns 21. A good chunk of the dialogue is paraphrased from Shakespeare, with a Falstaffian character thrown in for good measure — though the dream-like sequences and somewhat arbitrary vignettes stray wildly from the original text. Reeves' monologues are certainly no St. Crispin's Day speech.
 The Lion King (1994)
Based on: Hamlet

There is some debate over whether The Lion King's resemblance to Hamletwas intentional, but it's hard to ignore the parallels. The scheming uncle who murders the young prince's father (Claudius/Scar), the appearance of the dead king as a ghost (King Hamlet/Mufasa), the prince's strange friends who serve as comic relief (Rosencrantz and Guildenstern/Timon and Pumba). Where the two versions differ the most — apart from the singing animals, of course — is the ending. In Hamlet, pretty much everyone dies. In The Lion King, Simba has a happy ending and retakes the throne with the help of Nala. Though Scar still dies, it's at the hand of his former hyena minions, and not Simba himself.
10 Things I Hate About You (1999)
Based on: The Taming of the Shrew

The 1999 adaptation of The Taming of the Shrew stars Heath Ledger as a bad boy who is paid to woo Julia Stiles, the "shrew," so that her father will allow her younger sister to date. The film uses many of the same names, like Kat for (Katherina) and her younger sister Bianca, and manages to sneak in a few Shakespearean quotes: "I burn, I pine, I perish," says Joseph Gordon Levitt's Cameron, who is in love with Bianca. Of course, the movie also throws in all the usual teen rom-com staples: A high-school dance, awkward poetry, and a date at a paintball arena (as well as the slightly less customary erotica-writing guidance counselor).
O (2001)
Based on: Othello

Just two years after 10 Things I Hate About You, Julia Stiles landed another teen version of a Shakespeare character — this time a knock-off of Othello's Desdemona named "Desi" in 2001's O. O stars Mekhi Phifer as Odin, a basketball star manipulated by steroid-addicted "Hugo" (not Iago) — until his jealousy gets the better of him and, echoing Shakespeare's original text, he murders Desi and kills himself.
She's The Man (2006)
Based on: Twelfth Night

This Amanda Bynes-Channing Tatum flick draws its plot from Twelfth Night, with Illyria High School substituting for the land of Illyria. Bynes' Viola disguises herself as her brother so she can play soccer — a minor deviation from the original, where she dresses as a eunuch and lands a job with the local duke. She's The Man borrows many of the names and romantic shenanigans from the original text, and adds a gratuitous shout-out to Shakespeare by slipping in the play's most famous quote, spoken by Channing Tatum's "Duke": "Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them."
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« Last Edit: June 19, 2016, 02:51:06 PM by irina »

Offline Afroza Akhter Tina

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Re: Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2016, 09:38:02 AM »
...worth reading Madam  :)




Afroza Akhter Tina
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Department of English, DIU

Offline Tahsina

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Re: Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2016, 10:20:53 AM »
Irina'pa, I notice that you didn't include the Hindi adaptations...there are a few.
Tahsina Yasmin
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Offline Nurul Mohammad Zayed

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Re: Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2016, 11:13:34 PM »
Worthy Post ..........
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Offline irina

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Re: Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2016, 04:49:16 PM »
Hindi adaptations.......Haider? :-\

Offline Tahsina

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Re: Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2016, 11:48:58 AM »
Among the recent ones apart from Haider, Maqbool and Omkara are there. Do Dooni Chaar is an old one.
You can also consider Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak to have the star-crossed lovers depicted like Romeo & Juliet.
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Offline irina

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Re: Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2016, 11:11:26 AM »
Dear Tahsina
Thank you so.......much.

Offline fatema_diu

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Re: Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2016, 01:52:40 PM »

   I found that there are 525 films which give Shakespeare some sort of credit.    Of those, 294 are full adaptations of Shakespeare plays
    Hamlet is the most often adapted Shakespeare play. Over half of all Shakespeare feature film adaptations are based on Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth or Othello.

Offline Nurul Mohammad Zayed

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Re: Adaptations of Shakespearean plays
« Reply #12 on: July 28, 2016, 10:50:12 PM »
Splendid Interaction .... True Essence of Forum ....... 
Nurul Mohammad Zayed
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Faculty of Business & Economics
Daffodil International University