How to Stop Being Sad and Stay Awesome

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Offline Shamim Ansary

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How to Stop Being Sad and Stay Awesome
« on: May 09, 2022, 04:35:13 PM »
It does feel bad when feeling sad. How to Stop Being Sad? Yes, it's time to drop the spoon, and let's get you out of the dark - because we've asked professionals how to defeat the Blues. See, you're already (almost) laughing. This article will give an overview of how to stop being sad in the shortest possible time.

How to Stop Being Sad

Here is some possible solution on how to stop being sad:

1. Don't feel bad if you feel bad

When something negative happens in your life - a breakup, a death, a job loss. For example - it might feel like your world is ending, so it's normal to feel awful.

"All emotions are important to feel and can have valuable information about our lives," said Dr. Laurie Rocamore of Ceri di, "consider this an opportunity to learn, grow and seek the true healing," said Brianna Borten, CEO of the wellness company DragonTree.

2. Determine why you are sad first

Sometimes it's easy to pinpoint the reason you get worse - as you simply can't get over your ex. Other times you may be sad for no understandable reason.

When life coach, radio host and author Sunny Joy Macmillan advises, try putting out a pen and paper in this case and "write without pausing for five minutes."

He calls these brain dumping calls You can also try journaling, meditation, yoga, or any other exercise that will help you focus on your heart. You can also practice solving quizzes or puzzles.

3. Then, let it hit

When you completely avoid suffering, you are actually doing more harm than good. Life coach and author Nancy Levin says, "What you do not feel you cannot cure. This is the way how do you stop being sad.

In other words, stop rocking-shopping, spin off your back-to-back spin classes, and stop tequila shots (or whatever else).

No matter how uncomfortable it may be, embracing your grief is the first step to feeling good.

4. Try yelling at it

Levin said that while he was sad, he liked to do something that he called "crashing" music, while that might seem counter-intuitive, he was actually into something, "only people display sensitive crying," Dr. Matt Bales, Says Ph.D., psychologist, and author.

And not to get too much science-fiction, Bayless says a biochemical analysis of the tears found an endorphin called leucine-enkephalin, which is known to reduce pain and improve mood. So, let those tears flow!

5. Now, try moving forward

Once you have an ugly cry until your eyes are lit, it's time to draw on things. This can take days, weeks, or months. "Grief doesn't live in a timeline," Levin says, but you can't stay in the dark hole forever.

6. Humorously set the bar lower

"Lay the foundation for success by taking the smallest possible incremental steps," advises Macmillan. For example, you brushed your teeth, hoorah!

You made some coffee, there you go! "Once you move you may be surprised that you feel inspired to do more," she says as the answer to how to stop being sad.

7. Find what pleases you (And laughter)

It is the opposite of a crush. Instead, choose a few writers, musicians, and/or movies that make you feel truly beautiful, Macmillan suggests. You are attracted to something that gives you a broader perspective on life or just a simple, silly joke, pick up work that raises your soul. Take it.

Even a cat video on YouTube can be helpful! "Laughter can be a terrific coping mechanism in response to pain and grief," Bayless says, "while laughter releases endorphins, such as exercise, reduce stress hormone cortisol and increases dopamine (aka 'feeling-good-hormone')." Of course, the process of mourning is time. "So it's no shame to smile for a while," assures Bayles.

8. And look for your people

It's important to have a support network, especially if you're having a hard time. If you don't know where to start, "start doing things outside the room that other people are involved in," says Borten, for example, choosing something like a running club or photography class that usually interests you.

"You will be amazed at how quickly a community is formed" "and it's great to have IRL friends, even an online community that can be kind and responsive.

Try searching Facebook for groups that might be able to offer support - for example, bereavement/bereavement support groups.

Or, interested parties (travel? Cooking? Even crochet!) Find like-minded people who can encourage your spirituality with a common passion. Just "make sure an online group is a loving place that engages people with a common goal."

9. Re-publish your thoughts

Let's say after the breakup, you keep telling yourself that you will never find love again. After all, you feel like your heart has been ripped off with a butter knife, and even seeing the wedding cigar over and over again has not helped.

It's time to change your negative narrative (therapists call this strategy cognitive restructuring). For example, Macmillan says, instead of saying to yourself, "I'll be alone forever," try saying "I will find love again." (Or even a speech like "I can get love again," even better!) You will feel more at peace and less sad and eventually you will believe it.

10. Spend time in nature

Rockmore suggests experiencing the outdoors in your five senses. He calls it "behavioral activation," focusing on what you see, feel, hear, smell and possibly taste in nature, maybe free of your difficulty.

"Getting out of hibernation and staying active stimulates the nervous system and gives people a chance to see the beauty of the world," says Rockland.

11. Looking for help

If your grief goes beyond the blues - your sleep patterns and eating habits, you're not interested in the activities you enjoy - you owe it to yourself to feel better.

Self-help books are a good tool: Rockmore's Happiness Trap and Beat the Blues recommend before you hit. However, if it is overwhelming to cope alone, talking to a physician can be extremely helpful in how to stop being sad.

Source: https://www.lifesimile.com/how-to-stop-being-sad/
« Last Edit: May 09, 2022, 04:38:39 PM by Shamim Ansary »
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