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Topics - Touseef

Pages: [1] 2
1
English / A Review of “From Generation to Generation"
« on: April 05, 2017, 06:15:20 PM »
What We Owe the Past: A Review of “From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memories and Contemporary Art”:

http://hgmsblog.weebly.com/

2
English / Words I find interesting
« on: April 05, 2017, 06:08:13 PM »
im·bri·cate
ˈimbrəˌkāt/
Zoology Botany
verb
verb: imbricate; 3rd person present: imbricates; past tense: imbricated; past participle: imbricated; gerund or present participle: imbricating

    1.
    arrange (scales, sepals, plates, etc.) so that they overlap like roof tiles.
    "these molds have spherical bodies composed of imbricated triangular plates"
        overlap.
        "a coating of imbricating scales"

adjective
adjective: imbricate
ˈēmbrəkət/

    1.
    (of scales, sepals, plates, etc.) having adjacent edges overlapping.

4
English / Roland Barthes’s Mythologies
« on: April 05, 2017, 04:58:11 PM »
An Animated Introduction to Roland Barthes’s Mythologies and How He Used Semiotics to Decode Popular Culture:

http://www.openculture.com/2017/04/animated-introduction-to-roland-barthess-mythologies.html

5
English / Requiem for the American Dream
« on: April 04, 2017, 08:14:14 PM »
Requiem for the American Dream: The 10 Principles of Concentration of Wealth & Power

https://www.sevenstories.com/books/3993-requiem-for-the-american-dream

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English / "THE FIRST SENSE" By Nadine Gordimer
« on: April 04, 2017, 12:35:50 PM »
She has never felt any resentment that he became a musician and she didn’t. Could hardly call her amateur flute-playing a vocation. Envy? Only pride in the achievement that he was born for. She sits at a computer in a city-government office, earning, under pleasant enough conditions, a salary that has at least provided regularly for their basic needs, while his remuneration for the privilege of being a cellist in a symphony orchestra has been sometimes augmented by chamber-music engagements, sometimes not; in the summer, the off season for the orchestra, he is dependent on these performances on the side.

Their social life is in his professional circle—fellow-musicians, music critics, aficionados whose connections insure them free tickets, and the musical families in which most of the orchestra members grew up, the piano-teacher or choir-singing mothers and church-organist fathers. When new acquaintances remember to give her the obligatory polite attention, with the question “What do you do?,” and she tells them, they clearly wonder what she and the cellist who is married to her have in common.

As for her, she found when she was still an adolescent—the time for discovering parental limitations—that her cheerful father, with his sports shop and the beguiling heartiness that is a qualification for that business, and her mother, with her groupies exchanging talk of female reproductive maladies, from conception to menopause, did not have in their comprehension what it was that she wanted to do. A school outing at sixteen had taken her to a concert where she heard, coming out of a slim tube held to human lips, the call of the flute. Much later, she was able to identify the auditory memory as Mozart’s Flute Concerto No. 2 in D, K. 314. Meanwhile, attribution didn’t matter any more than the unknown name of a bird that sang heart-piercingly, hidden in her parents’ garden. The teacher who had arranged the cultural event was understanding enough to put the girl in touch with a musical youth group in the city. She babysat on weekends to pay for the hire of a flute, and began to attempt to learn how to produce with her own breath and fingers something of what she had heard.

He was among the Youth Players. His instrument was the very antithesis of the flute. Part of the language of early attraction was a kind of repartee about this, showoff, slangy, childish. The sounds he drew from the overgrown violin between his knees: the complaining moo of a sick cow; the rasp of a blunt saw; a long fart. “Excuse me!” he would say, with a clownish lift of the eyebrows and a down-twisted mouth. His cello, like her flute, was a secondhand donation to the Players from the estate of some old man or woman that was of no interest to family descendants. He tended it in a sensuous way, which, if she had not been so young and innocent, she could have read as an augur of how his lovemaking would begin. Within a year, his exceptional talent had been recognized by the professional musicians who coached these young people voluntarily, and the cello was declared his, no longer on loan.

They played together when alone, to amuse themselves and secretly imagine that they were already in concert performance, the low, powerful cadence coming from the golden-brown body of the cello making her flute voice sound, by contrast, more like that of a squeaking mouse than it would have heard solo. In time, she reached a certain level of minor accomplishment. He couldn’t lie to her. They had, with the complicity of his friends, found a place where they could make love—for her, the first time—and, out of commitment to a sincerity beyond their years, he couldn’t deceive her and let her suffer the disillusions of persisting with a career that was not open to her level of performance. Already she had been hurt, dismayed at being replaced by other young flautists when ensembles were chosen for public performances by “talented musicians of the future.”

“You’ll still have the pleasure of playing the instrument you love best.”

She would always remember what she said: “The cello is the instrument I love best.”

7
English / 54-Volume Encyclopedia on African Culture
« on: April 04, 2017, 12:21:54 PM »
Ghanaian Art Historian is Creating a 54-Volume Encyclopedia on African Culture:

http://www.therealafrican.com/2017/03/ghanaian-art-historian-is-creating-a-54-volume-encyclopedia-on-african-culture/

Dr. Khan Touseef Osman
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

8
English / Shakespearean notepad stuns Antiques Roadshow expert
« on: April 03, 2017, 02:35:16 PM »
Shakespearean notepad stuns Antiques Roadshow expert:

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-berkshire-39452558?SThisFB

Dr. Khan Touseef Osman
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

9
English / The Man Who Saved the Skyscraper
« on: April 03, 2017, 01:50:33 PM »
The Man Who Saved the Skyscraper: Fazlur Khan and the idea that would turn architecture on its head.

https://mentalfloss.atavist.com/the-man-who-saved-the-skyscraper

Dr. Khan Touseef Osman
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

10
English / Familiar Stranger by Stuart Hall review
« on: April 02, 2017, 07:01:58 PM »
Familiar Stranger by Stuart Hall review – from Jamaica to the New Left and Thatcherism:

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/mar/31/familiar-stranger-a-life-between-two-islands-by-stuart-hall-review?utm_content=buffer3d9ae&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer


Dr. Khan Touseef Osman
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

11
English / Open Access eBooks on JSTOR
« on: April 02, 2017, 06:43:04 PM »
Open Access eBooks on JSTOR:

http://about.jstor.org/open-access?cid=soc_fb_JSTOR


Dr. Khan Touseef Osman
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

12
English / The Writer of Modern Life
« on: April 02, 2017, 02:45:10 PM »
The Writer of Modern Life: Three scholars on the making of Indian literature:

http://www.caravanmagazine.in/reviews-essays/scholars-making-indian-literature


Dr. Khan Touseef Osman
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

13
English / The most relevant dystopian novel for our time
« on: April 02, 2017, 02:40:51 PM »
The most relevant dystopian novel for our time is not 1984 — it's Lord of the Flies:

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-schillinger-dystopian-fiction-trump-20170316-story.html

Dr. Khan Touseef Osman
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

14
English / Emily Dickinson Was Fiercer Than You Think
« on: April 02, 2017, 02:35:06 PM »
Emily Dickinson Was Fiercer Than You Think:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/emily-dickinson-fiercer-than-think-180962479/


Dr. Khan Touseef Osman
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

15
English / The 10 best short story collections
« on: March 30, 2017, 02:01:06 PM »
The 10 best short story collections:

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2014/oct/17/the-10-best-short-story-collections

Dr. Khan Touseef Osman
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Daffodil International University

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