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Topics - shamshoque

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76
English / Another word
« on: May 02, 2017, 12:35:10 PM »
Can any one out there help one of my students finding the meaning of the word, " Saviter" please?
Shams Hoque
Associate Professor in English
DIU

77
English / Why do we teach?
« on: April 23, 2017, 10:04:23 AM »
 8)  I have taught almost my whole entire life at home and abroad for more than four decades. I asked so many of my colleagues the same question time and again but very few were able to give me an appropriate answer. I'd now  ask all my present colleagues at DIU the same question for their input in this. And the question  is:

Why do teach at all?

Shams Hoque
Associate Professor in English
DIU


78
English / Difference between a school master and a station master
« on: April 15, 2017, 12:06:08 PM »
Teacher? Well, may be this is my fault. I can't access Mr. Laskar's post on Teacher. Still,  I have got a question here:

" What is the single difference between a school master and a station master?"

Shams Hoque
Associate Professor in English
DIU

79
Lord Macaulay said the following about India in 1835 in British Parliament.
 
"I have traveled across the length and breadth of India and I have not seen one person who is a beggar, who is a thief. Such wealth I have seen in this country, such high moral values, people of such calibre, that I do not think we would ever conquer this country, unless we break the very backbone of this nation, which is her spiritual and cultural heritage, and, therefore, I propose that we replace her old and ancient education system, her culture, for if the Indians think that all that is foreign and English is good and greater than their own, they will lose their self-esteem, their native self-culture and they will become what we want them, a truly dominated nation."

Macaulay's "Minute Upon Indian Education"

"To remove all doubt, however, Macaulay produced and circulated a Minute on the subject.[7] Macaulay argued that support for the publication of books in Sanskrit and Arabic should be withdrawn, support for traditional education should be reduced to funding for the Madrassa at Delhi and the Hindu College at Benares, but students should no longer be paid to study at these establishments.[8] The money released by these steps should instead go to fund education in Western subjects, with English as the language of instruction. He summarised his argument:

    To sum up what I have said, I think it is clear that we are not fettered by the Act of Parliament of 1813; that we are not fettered by any pledge expressed or implied; that we are free to employ our funds as we choose; that we ought to employ them in teaching what is best worth knowing; that English is better worth knowing than Sanskrit or Arabic; that the natives are desirous to be taught English, and are not desirous to be taught Sanskrit or Arabic; that neither as the languages of law, nor as the languages of religion, have the Sanskrit and Arabic any peculiar claim to our engagement; that it is possible to make natives of this country thoroughly good English scholars, and that to this end our efforts ought to be directed."

80
English / Differentiated Instruction for a successful lesson
« on: April 12, 2017, 06:50:34 PM »
One needs to ensure-
Differentiated Instruction
One would:
build lessons, develop teaching materials, use "realia" with practical life examples and vary their approach so that all students, regardless of where they are starting from, can learn content effectively, according to their needs.
That's "Do", isn't it?
Shams Hoque
Associate Professor in English
DIU

81
One needs to ensure-
Differentiated Instruction
One would:
build lessons, develop teaching materials, use "realia" with practical life examples and vary their approach so that all students, regardless of where they are starting from, can learn content effectively, according to their needs.
That's "Do", isn't it?
Shams Hoque
Associate Professor in English
DIU

82
English / An Ideal ELT lesson!: Some tips
« on: April 12, 2017, 04:30:25 PM »
Some Do’s in an English lesson:
•   Use a variety of strategies. (Thought-provoking questions, pair-work, group work, peer-teaching, peer-checking, short acting out,
       debate on lesson issues bla, bla, bla…)
•   Act like a teacher. Both students and teachers will look up to you as a role model. Act professional.
•   Make class interesting. Prepare a variety of activities, quick tests, and games.
•   Be consistent with the rules. You shouldn’t play “favourites”---make sure you treat all your students equally.
•   Plan your lessons ahead of time. Winging it doesn’t work. You will have to think about what you want to teach before you enter
        the classroom.
•   Make sure the topic is appropriate. Avoid issues that might spark sentiments.
•   Speak clearly and loudly maintaining good pronunciation,acceptable accent and appropriate intonation .
•   Tell the students why you want them to do something.
•   Expect the unexpected.  Always have a back-up plan.
•   Ask your students for feedback. They might also have suggestions for things that you can do in class.
•   Adapt your teaching style. Some students like to thinking things over and have everything perfect before speaking. Others want   
        to shout out the answer as soon as they know it.
•   Bring “realia” into the classroom. Pictures from magazines, photos from home,                stories from you own life, real 
        objects
        make lessons come alive.
•   Group English language learners in mixed-ability groups.
•   For new skills and knowledge expect the ELLs to produce work in English at their own levels.
•   Use it sparingly to address cultural incompatibility or language-specific pragmatism

Some Dont’s:
•   Wear weekend clothes to class. Jogging pants, jeans or shorts aren’t acceptable.
•   Dumb students down. Just because they can’t answer a question, Ask a different    question or see if someone can help the   
        student.
•   Embarrass your students.
•   Translate or paraphrase everything into L1.
•   Code switch for ELT.

83
English / Re: Code switching in EFL/ESL class lesson
« on: April 09, 2017, 05:47:25 PM »
 Re: Code switching in EFL/ESL class lesson?

I'm just trying to have a feel among our colleagues about delivery of our lessons in 100% TL (Target Language) which is English. They say 100% use of TL is a prerequisite for Communicative Language Teaching (CLT).
My question is:
Are we delivering our lessons, be it English language or,  English literature, in 100% TL? If not, why not?
Or, does code switching help learners learn better? If yes, how?

I'd request my colleagues to join in the debate. Thank you.

84
English / Code switching in EFL/ESL lessons
« on: April 09, 2017, 10:23:56 AM »
I'm just trying to have a feel among our colleagues about delivery of our lessons in 100% TL (Target Language) which is English. They say 100% use of TL is a prerequisite for Communicative Language Teaching (CLT).
My question is:
Are we delivering our lessons, be it English language or,  English literature, in 100% TL? If not, why not?
Or, does code switching help learners learn better? If yes, how?

I'd request my colleagues to join in the debate. Thank you.

85
Common Forum / Code switching in EFL/ESL lessons
« on: April 09, 2017, 10:22:01 AM »
I'm just trying to have a feel among our colleagues about delivery of our lessons in 100% TL (Target Language) which is English. They say 100% use of TL is a prerequisite for Communicative Language Teaching (CLT).
My question is:
Are we delivering our lessons, be it English language or,  English literature, in 100% TL? If not, why not?
I'd request my colleagues to join in the debate. Thank you.

86
CLT (Communicative Language Teaching) is the most recent approach of teaching English in Bangladesh. We have been trying to implement the new English curricula for the last decade or so in Bangladesh. Quite a few studies show we have miserably failed to implement the programs of CLT at the primary and secondary levels. Practitioners are baffled by the impractical and culturally inappropriate  demands of the "new thing." I wonder if colleagues, practitioners and relevant people could help find some solutions to the problems posed in the area of ELT (English Language Teaching). Thanks. Shams Hoque

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