Old English Literature

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Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Old English Literature
« on: December 08, 2011, 08:10:31 PM »
The Anglo-Saxons brought their Germanic language with them and adopted very little of the Celtic language spoken by the British inhabitants, except for place names.

The language was at first almost introduced from the other languages, but the conversion to the Christianity in the seventeenth century brought in some Latin words to describe the new ideas. For exp: church, monk, school

Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2011, 08:11:26 PM »
-This language differs greatly in vocabulary and syntax from the rudimentary attempts of the prose writers.

-In such a society ,the poet is the keeper of the traditions which hold the cynn(kin) together .

-The king is the keeper of the treasure which is the Cynn’s only possession and defense.

-In some cases, in such a society the poet are the historian and priest, and his songs have ritual significance.

Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2011, 08:13:49 PM »
-The written records of it are so different from the language of the earliest prose-writers. The cynn people few common interests.

-The poetic vocabulary of old English was rich and varied, but come from the language of the ordinary life.

-The Anglo-Saxon language had the power of making new words to express new thought .


Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2011, 08:15:00 PM »
-Literacy was mainly restricted to the servants of the church and so, it is natural that the bulk of old English literature deals with religious sources and mostly drawn from Latin sources.
-The manuscripts were costly, a durable material made from the prepared skins of domestic animals.

Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2011, 08:16:24 PM »
-A relatively small amount of old English secular verse has survived in manuscripts which proves that the interest of the Anglo –Saxon monks and nuns were not   
 isolated from those of laypeople.

-The subject matter of this verse is sometimes of great antiquity, concerning legendary or historical figures that lived before the Anglo-Saxon conquest of England.

-The tribes is ruled by a chieftain who is called the king.

Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2011, 08:16:54 PM »
The lord surrounds himself with a band of retainers (many of them are his blood kindred) who are member of his household.

He leads his men in battle and rewards them with the spoils; royal generosity is one of the most important aspects of heroic behaviour.

In return, the retainers are obliged to fight for their lord.

Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2011, 08:17:50 PM »
The Messages…

Blood vengeance is regarded as a sacred duty and in poetry everlasting shame waits for those who fail to observe it.

The message of Christianity teaches us that we should ‘forgive those that trespass against us’ and that ‘all that take the sword shall perish with the sword’.

Christianity and heroic ideas are poignantly blended in The Wanderer which laments the separation from one’s lord kinsmen and the transience of all earthly treasures

Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2011, 08:19:03 PM »
OLD ENGLISH

The style of such poetry inevitably seems strange in a modern prose translation, which does not attempt to convey the rhythm of the alliterative meter. Because special vocabulary and compounds are among the chief poetic effects, the verse is constructed in such a way to show off such terms by creating a series of theme in apposition.

The overall effects of the language are formalized and elevate speech. Instead of being straight forward, it moves at a slow and stately pace with steady indirectness.

Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2011, 08:19:54 PM »
A grim irony pervades heroic poetry even at the level of diction where fighting is called ‘battle-play’. An irony is also a mood perception in old English poetry.

The Anglo-Saxon invaders brought with them a tradition of oral poetry because nothing was written down before the conversion to Christianity.

Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2011, 08:21:08 PM »
Oral Literature

They arise from the necessity of the not breaking down during performance.

It was not be thought of that the oral poets memorized their lays; of course they had the main outline of the story by heart, but any theme or episode could be embroidered ,contracted, changed or dropped altogether, according to the receptivity of the audience on that particular evening.

Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2011, 08:22:16 PM »
Every re-telling was a new poem, each as authentic, original and authoritative as the last; and every performance was different.

The old English verse is rich and formal; it inherits these qualities from ritual language.

The vocabulary and the technique of oral composition come down from times when poetry was mantic and used for magical purpose, when it played an inseparable part in the rituals that introduced, celebrated and interpreted the events and seasons of men’s lifetime and of the ritual year.

Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2011, 08:23:38 PM »
A TRANSITION...

With the introduction of Christianity in England, a new kind of poetry emerged. Through Christianity is the theoretical antithesis of the military, the results in England was curious. Christianity and militarism, the two opposing philosophy have been harnessed together. so, there appeared under the tutelage of the church another type of epic literature which tried to put together the warrior’s outlook and Christian theology.

Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2011, 08:25:09 PM »

In "The Dream of the Rood" ,which is the first of all religious poems, Christ has been described as the young hero, and His disciples are faithful warriors.

So, the Christian poems are mainly religious in tone, the old devices of style are carried on and adapted in new subject.

Offline Gopa B. Caesar

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #13 on: December 08, 2011, 08:25:34 PM »
The Anglo-Saxon invaders brought with them a tradition of oral poetry because nothing was written down before the conversion to Christianity.

Offline Ferdousi Begum

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Re: Old English Literature
« Reply #14 on: December 10, 2011, 10:41:46 PM »
I heard that you are an instructor of this course, are these your home works...lol...