Dr. Binoy Barman's Article

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Offline md

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Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« on: April 18, 2010, 12:00:50 PM »
Dr Binoy Barman, Assistant Professor and Head, Department of English, Daffodil International University contribute lot to the society through his writing in various media. Pls see his Article-
http://www.thedailystar.net/campus/2010/04/03/last.htm

Please read my article "The pledge of Pahela Baishakh" published in the Bangla New Year special supplement of the the Daily Star on 14 April 2010 following the link below:
http://www.thedailystar.net/suppliments/2010/04/pohelaboishakh/page6.htm
« Last Edit: April 18, 2010, 09:03:34 PM by md »

Offline shibli

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Re: Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2010, 03:34:57 PM »

We are proud to have got three prolific writers at DIU, one of whom is Dr. Binoy Barman and the other ones are Dr. Yusuful Islam and Mr. Raju.

Dr. Binoy Barman has been writing continuously in the Daily Star for a long time and thus propagating DIU. We wish that he would continue doing so and we wish him all the best in life.

« Last Edit: April 18, 2010, 03:36:28 PM by shibli »
Those who worship the natural elements enter darkness (Air, Water, Fire, etc.). Those who worship sambhuti sink deeper in darkness. [Yajurveda 40:9]; Sambhuti means created things, for example table, chair, idol, etc.

Offline raju

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Re: Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2010, 07:27:08 AM »
Dear Shibli Bhai,

Thanks for your appreciation but you are also part of this team no doubt. AND I am sure some more people will join us soon for growing together!

Developmentally yours,

Raju
Syed Mizanur Rahman
Head, General Educational Development &
Director of Students' Affairs, DIU

Offline Razon Mahmood

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Re: Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2010, 04:25:40 PM »
Respected Sir,
I have read your article. It is such a wonderful writing. Really, I feel proud to become a student of the English Department of DIU. 
You'll never find a rainbow if you're looking down-Charles Chaplin

Offline Binoy

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Re: Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2010, 01:51:26 PM »
Please read my article "Did Shakespeare hate women?" published in the Star Campus on 25 April 2010 following the link:
http://www.thedailystar.net/campus/2010/04/04/camspotlight.htm

Offline Hari Pada Roy

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Re: Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2010, 01:25:33 AM »
Sir,     


I have read your article. It is a very nice writing. Really, I feel proud to become a student of the English           Department.

Offline Binoy

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Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2010, 10:20:27 AM »
Please read my article "The myth of classless society" published in Star Campus on 02 May 2010, following the link:
http://www.thedailystar.net/campus/2010/05/01/last.htm

Offline shibli

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Re: Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2010, 11:04:31 AM »
Dear Dr. Binoy sir

keep it up! I like the lines "Man is greedy in nature. They always want to consume more than others. It is inherent in their mental make-up. The allure of consumer goods ultimately overwhelms the utilitarian interest."

regards
Those who worship the natural elements enter darkness (Air, Water, Fire, etc.). Those who worship sambhuti sink deeper in darkness. [Yajurveda 40:9]; Sambhuti means created things, for example table, chair, idol, etc.

Offline Shamim Ansary

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Re: Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2010, 03:28:53 PM »
All the replies are very nice and a kind of reflection of my mind. I am also an avid reader of our respected Binoy sir. He is undoubtly an asstet for DIU. I am pleased to be in touch of him. His divergification of thinking angles astonishes me. May he live long.

His write up "The Myth of Classless Society" is a timely one. He reflects the vision of Karl Marx, the great German philosopher, political economist, historian and social scientist. The curse of materialism has been suppressing the classless society. Their agony of souls is being treaded by the so called elite class. Class discrimination obviously makes the social order shaky. We should pay tribute to those labour class people who make the pavement of our civilization smooth. By reckoning the past history, we have witnessed that, when the deprived class revolted, they had been treated as extremists. Preventation is better than cure. The elixir of pacifying classless society is to pay their rational wages.

With regards,

Shamim Ansary
MA student, Department of English
&
Administrative Officer, DIU
"Many thanks to Allah who gave us life after having given us death and (our) final return (on the Day of Qiyaamah (Judgement)) is to Him"

Offline Binoy

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Hawking's alien scare
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2010, 09:51:47 AM »
Please read my article "Hawking's alien scare" published in the Star Campus on 09 May 2010, following the link:

http://www.thedailystar.net/campus/2010/05/02/last.htm

Offline shibli

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Re: Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2010, 11:47:28 AM »
Dr. Binoy Sir

I have become  a fan of your writing. Please keep it up. Let's read the following write-up as well to know time is nothing but a perception.

The fact that time is a perception was proved by the greatest physicist of the 20th century, Albert Einstein, in his "General Theory of Relativity". In his book, The Universe and Dr. Einstein, Lincoln Barnett says this:

Along with absolute space, Einstein discarded the concept of absolute time - of a steady, unvarying inexorable universal time flow, streaming from the infinite past to the infinite future. Much of the obscurity that has surrounded the Theory of Relativity stems from man's reluctance to recognize that sense of time, like sense of colour, is a form of perception.

"we can understand that the idea that time moves forward is totally a conditioned response."

Einstein himself pointed out, as quoted in Barnett's book: "Space and time are forms of intuition, which can no more be divorced from consciousness than can our concepts of colour, shape, or size."

According to the "General Theory of Relativity", time is not absolute; apart from the series of events according to which we measure it, it has no independent existence.

Our dreams are very important in understanding the relativity of time. In our sleep we experience events that we believe go on for days but actually, we are having a dream which lasts for only a few minutes or even a few seconds.

In order to make this clearer, let us think of an example. Let us think of a specially designed room with one window and that we spend a certain amount of time in it. In the room there is a clock by which we will be able to see the passage of time. Through the window we can see the sun coming up and going down at regular intervals. After a few days we are asked how long we have stayed in the room. Our answer will be calculated by information we have received based on looking at the clock from time to time and on how many times the sun rose and set. For example, we calculate that we have spent three days in the room. But if the person who put us in the room comes and says that we were actually in the room for two days, that the sun we saw in the window was actually artificially produced, and that the clock in the room was fast, then our calculations would make no sense.

This example shows that our knowledge about the rate at which time passes depends on references which change according to the person who is perceiving it.

One twin sister takes a space trip at a speed close to the speed of light. When she returns thirty years later, the sister who stayed on the earth will be much older compared to the sister who went into space.

This is an example of how under different circumstances a person perceives the same amount of time as longer or shorter. Here is another example. For a person who is waiting for his brother to come out of an operation, one hour seems like several. But if the same person is doing something he really enjoys, he cannot understand how the hour passed so quickly.

Einstein scientifically established the following fact in his "General Theory of Relativity": The rate at which time passes changes according to the speed of a body and its distance from the center of gravity. If the speed increases, time decreases, contracts, moves slower and seems that the point of inertia approaches.

Let us explain this with one of Einstein's thought experiments. Suppose that there are two twin brothers. One of them stays in this world, the other goes on a space journey during which he travels almost at the speed of light. When he returns from space, he will find that his twin brother is much older than he is. The reason for this is that the time passed much more slowly for the brother who went on the space trip. The same example can be thought of in relation to a father who went on a space trip in a rocket traveling at nearly 99 percent of the speed of time and his son who remained on this earth. According to Einstein, if the father was 27 years old and his son was three, 30 earth-years later when the father returned to earth, the son would be 33 and the father would be 30 years old.

The relativity of time is not something that is relative to the speeding up or slowing down of the clock; it comes from the fact that every material system, to the particles at the subatomic level, works at different rates of speed. In an environment where time was slowed down, a person's heartbeat, rate of cell division and brain activity would happen more slowly. In this situation, a person would go about his daily business unaware that time had slowed down.
Those who worship the natural elements enter darkness (Air, Water, Fire, etc.). Those who worship sambhuti sink deeper in darkness. [Yajurveda 40:9]; Sambhuti means created things, for example table, chair, idol, etc.

Offline Shamim Ansary

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Re: Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2010, 05:36:32 PM »
Informative post. Carry on...
"Many thanks to Allah who gave us life after having given us death and (our) final return (on the Day of Qiyaamah (Judgement)) is to Him"

Offline rumman

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Re: Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2010, 08:26:18 PM »
I am very proud to see this article. Please keep it up sir.
Md. Abdur Rumman Khan
Senior Assistant Registrar

Offline BRE SALAM SONY

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Re: Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2010, 11:30:34 PM »
The pledge of Pahela Baishakh
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It is the same sun that rises in the morning of Pahela Baishakh, still it is different. It is the same ball of fire ambling in the sky but on the day it radiates with a different glow. With the golden ray of rhythm, the message of life spreads around: “Aji e probhatey robir kor kemoney poshilo praner por, kemone poshilo guhar adharey probhat pakhir gan, na jani kenorey etodin porey jagia uthilo pran.” (How at this dawn the ray of sun reached the soul, how the chirping of morning birds reached the gloom of cave, I know not why life rose after so many days.) The day breaks with a new vision in a new ambience. The day is auspicious for the Bengali community, a day of hope and aspiration, imbibed with the colour of passion. It is the most significant day of the Bangla calendar, heralding the sustenance of Bengali culture and heritage. It is the day when the Bengali nation, individually and collectively, make pledges to bring happiness and prosperity for them.

The most prominent pledge that a Bengali makes on Pahela Baishakh is taking a fresh view of life, shedding off all dust of past faults and failures. The pledge is moral in itself. People throw away their shady thoughts and fill their brain-cells with honest ideas. They promise to refrain from all sorts of evil deeds and engage in activities beneficial for themselves and others. Their moral elevation comes through a ritual of bidding farewell to the old and welcoming the new. They dress themselves up with new costumes, taking a bath of consecration. They exchange greetings and embrace each other in freshness of body and mind. They invoke the good with music, for purification of inner and outer environment. In a chorus they sing: “Esho hey Baishakh esho esho, toposho nishwasho baye mumursherey dao oraye, bochhorer aborjona dur hoye jak….” (Come Baishakh, come, with a fresh breath of air, blow away the dying, let all debris of the year be removed.)

The freshness is reflected even in the delicacy people have on Pahela Baishakh. They initiate the day with modest food, to the best of their capacity, pleasing to the eyes, nostril and tongue alike. They cook traditional foods like khichuri and hilsha fish and relish to their heart's content. They open their door to the guests and feel gratified to entertain. Baishakh cuisine is a spectacular cultural heritage. Nowhere in the world can be found such an enthusiasm of feast like this. Some people even rise early in the morning and rush to the Barshabaran programme at Ramna Botumul to chew a piece of hilsha fish along with panta (watered rice). A bit of green chilli makes the occasion hotter. The hotels around the city also make brisk business adding traditional Bengali items to their menu. People love to act Bengali in their appetite and gastronomic pleasure on the day.

On Pahela Baishakh the Bengali people pledge to protect and uphold their language and culture that makes them unique as an ethnic community in the world. On the day the sweet vernacular sounds sweeter. People organise various programmes to celebrate the occasion with music full of verbal gaiety. Folk songs as well as Tagore and Nazrul make the air joyous. Poems are recited to enthral the Bengali heart. The rhythm of Baishakh is felt everywhere, village and city, every nook and corner of the country. In the city, big concerts are organised where the band groups present their high-beat numbers. Especially the young generation takes excitement in such tunes as “Melai jaire … bashonti rong shari porey lolonara hetey jai.” (We go to fair … girls wearing yellow sari walk on.) In the village, kobi gan and baul gan are arranged and the singers sing in the glory of tradition. Their voice chants: “Gramer nowjowan Hindu Musalman, milia baula gan ar murshidi gaitam, agey ki sundor din kataitam….” (We the Hindus and the Muslims in village sang baul and murshidi together, how beautiful days we used to pass earlier.)

Pahela Baishakh is the day of union. All the people of various religious communities --Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist and Christian -- come forward to celebrate the day, welcoming the good in unison. They find the common thread of culture tying them in a same lot and inspiring them to work together. The Bengali community also, as a whole, with their Bangaliyana, take a renewed pledge to forge firm solidarity with the rest of the world. They throw a friendly gesture to everybody and forget the old enmity. They extend their helping hand and warm heart to the people of other communities. A world of peace and harmony glistens in their eyes. The Bengali mantra of harmony is spread all over the world and the whole humanity is animated with the unifying appeal.

On Pahela Baishakh, the land takes a festive look. People celebrate the day with traditional festivities. Fairs are arranged in rural as well as urban areas. Some of them last for a day and some for a week while some others run month-long. The tunes of flutes and the beats of drums declare the triumph of the Bengali culture. People of all ages, irrespective of cast and creed, visit the Baishakhi Mela and buy handicrafts and traditional snacks like sondesh, nimki, murki, batasha and different types of cakes. The visitors to the fair never get tired to tread down the venue through the make-shift stalls and pick up things of their fancy. Roaming around the fair, the young minds turn romantic with patriotism. They chant: “Aha ki ananda akashey batashey, shakhey shakhey pakhi dakey, kato shobha charipashey….” (Oh how cheery the sky and wind is, birds sing in branches, beauty aplenty all around….)

Circus and jatra pala also add to the festivities of Baishakh in some places. As soon as circus tents are erected, the inhabitants get impatient to witness the miracle. The show attracts visitors from far and wide. The jatra pala is staged with social and historical themes. Behula Lokkhiandar, Chandraboti, Rupban or Bhawal Sanyasi appear on the stage to cheer up the traditional minds. It is held usually at night. The night time is spent witnessing the realities and dreams of Bengali life that the shows portray.

Pahela Baishakh is the day of revolt against darkness, narrowness and social maladies. People vow to get rid of all communal feelings on the day. They express their love for secularism and hatred for fanaticism. They feel they are Bengali above all other identities. On Pahela Baishakh, the Bengali pledge to remain Bengali. They feel the power of becoming so and let it grow in their spirit as long as they are alive.


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« Last Edit: May 14, 2010, 11:32:59 PM by BRE SALAM SONY »
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Offline BRE SALAM SONY

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Re: Dr. Binoy Barman's Article
« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2010, 11:37:40 PM »

Electric blues



SOME objects may cause discomfort in life with its presence while others may do so with its absence. Electricity is such a thing which takes a toll on life with its nagging absence. We, the Bangladeshis, are far away from the blessing brought about by the discovery of Benjamin Franklin and Alessandro Volta. We aspire for it but all in vain. It evades us like a dream. You and I are the victims of a bad dream.

Electricity, its presence and absence, has tremendous power to influence life. It induces change in life style, which is evident in my own life. Nowadays I am rising early and going for a walk, thanks to the lack of electricity. It becomes impossible to sleep without fan in the hot summer time, so better to take care of health, albeit rather unwillingly. Electric supply authority deserves felicitation for shedding load at the time when it is necessary to exercise.

I make attempts to get ready for office. I enter the bathroom but there is no water in tap. I complain to the landlord but his excuse is logical. There was no electricity so he could not run pump. I sit in the dining table for breakfast and am presented whatever was in the fridge. My mouth cannot take it as all is stale. The fridge could not keep food fresh for lack of electric support. I start for office with a body unbathed and unfed and a mind in tatters.

I try to turn on the computer, but of no avail. No electricity, again. I have some important work to do. I have to compose some documents and send and reply some emails. After a long wait I find the sweet arrival of electricity. It comes and goes, as if always on the run. It cannot stay for long as it is being chased by law enforcing agencies, lest it should be caught and hanged. The dream of Digital Bangladesh hovers in my mind. Yes, our Digital Bangladesh will be established without electricity. It is a magic slogan.

When electricity trips, I just stare at the ceiling fan like a thirsty frog. When will it move, when will the air roll, when will the stuffiness be removed? I sweat under my garments and gossip with my colleagues. They fan themselves with hard paper. We all take our lunch in heat and half-gloom.

We try to lessen the heat of our body with a cool drink. The body temperature somehow comes down but the head temperature goes out of control.

My mobile phone rings. Mother wants to talk to me. As I start talking, the mobile gives a low battery signal. I could not charge the battery. I rebuke myself. The mobile stops before I finish the necessary words. What a lousy guy I am! I plan to call back to mother after borrowing the phone of one of my colleagues. But I cannot find the number as it is stored in the memory of my mobile phone, which is now off, and not in my memory or note book. I relied too much on machine and this is the punishment.

I return home in the afternoon. I press the calling bell and it does not make any sound; that means there is no electricity. Bang, bang, bang! The door is opened and I enter the hot room. I take off my clothes and attempt to take a rest. I grab a hand-fan and revolve it. I take a cup of tea with a piece of biscuit. I set out for a stroll in the alley of the locality. I arrive at the kitchen market and buy some vegetables, though I am not sure whether they would at last be cooked or not.

I need to read something as a preparation for a lecture tomorrow. I engage myself in doing so under candle light. The flame flutters and my eyes swim across the dim pages of bright thoughts. At one time I feel tired and retire to sofa. Electricity returns and I switch on the television. I browse through the channels provided by the dish. Some channels are presenting news on how industry and agriculture of the country are being affected by power outage. Ministers are advising people to use electricity judiciously and utilise sun and wind as alternative sources of energy. I settle on an English film and get engrossed in the plot. The film reaches the climax just when the electricity disappears. What a humour!

I again finish my dinner in the candle light. Different types of insects romp around. I don't know why they like candle flame so much. Some merrily take their life flying into it. Some jump into my plate and dishes around. I cannot say how many of them land in my stomach with rice and curry. I take them as part of my feast. Solid and fresh and free. I again express my gratitude to the government for not providing electricity and take care of my health.

I look through the windows at the other flats around. I find some of them have lighted. They are using generators and IPS. Some have charger lights. They are not bothered by load shedding as they have alternative energy source. I look up and discover ghostly figures on some roofs. They are bathing in the moon light. They have no regret of gloom. They enjoy natural light and natural air.

I sit in the balcony and meditate on life and nation. I think of myself -- success and failure, comfort and discomfort. I think of the public weal and woe. I think of their rights and their downright rejection. Political commitments and their emptiness. The present and future world. The more I think the more I discover the truth. My inner world is illuminated by the absence of outer illumination.

I do a bit of walking after night meal. It will help to digest food. As I feel sleepy I go to bed like a phantom. Soon I fall asleep. I toss in sweltering heat amid unlimited pangs. I dream 2020 when all citizens of the country will get their share of electricity, to which they feel they have a right.

My life is well in vision even in darkness, like many others in Bangladesh. I do not mind huge waste of time. I do not need electricity whatsoever. I am enamoured of blackout. I wish if a pre-industrial and pre-mechanical era came back. I could lead a simple life in the lap of nature without electricity and all other urban elements. I have no sorrow caused by power outage. I just sing away the blues:

“It is a great fun to live without electricity
In the whole world Dhaka is the most comfortable city.”

(The writer is Assistant Professor and Head, Department of English, Daffodil International University.)
আল্লাহর রহমতে প্রতি বছর হজে যাওয়ার সুযোগ হচ্ছে।এভাবেই হাজীদের খেদমত করে যেতে চাই।
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