South Indian etiquette

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Offline bidita

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South Indian etiquette
« on: January 12, 2011, 10:22:28 AM »

There are many country in this world and different culture recognize by people...We see different people around us..Culture indicate a lots of human etiquette in this globe so we have to know there..
Its essential for our knowledge and experience..Then we should know different type of people with there culture...I have to share some topic's to you..Thanks..

These are some general etiquette guidelines for Southern India.

Step 1
When entering a house remove your shoes. It's OK to step on the designs on the ground outside the door , but don't step on similar designs in front of an alter. Shoes are also removed before entering temple grounds.

Step 2
Step through the door with your right foot first, especially the first time you visit a home.

Step 3
When handing something to someone use your right hand or both hands for larger objects. Never hand anything to someone with only your left.

Step 4
When bringing a gift to a family, give it to the female head of household if there is one, and always give it to her after your are inside the house, not through the door. The eldest woman in the visiting group usually gives the gift on behalf of the group or family.

Step 5
When you enter a room, greet the elders first. When greeting elders, or when you wish to be formal bow with hands together at the chest and say, "namaste" or "namaskaram". In Tamil Nadu the equivalent of Namaste is, "vanakkam". In a less formal situation with Telugu speakers you can use "bagunara" which is like, "how are you?" in English. The response to, "bagunara", is, "bagunanu", I'm good.

Step 6
When speaking to someone you've met before, ask how their family is. It's more expected to ask about each family member by name or relationship to the person you're talking to, instead of simply asking, "How's your family?", like you would in some other parts of the world.

Step 7
Don't cross your legs. Crossing the legs is a reserved for the eldest man in the room. You may meet people who don't observe this etiquette, but it's most respectful not to, especially with people you don't know well.

Step 8
Avoid touching adult members of the opposite sex. An exception may be made for shaking hands in some settings, but only shake hands if the woman offers her hand first, otherwise use the namaste bow greeting.

Step 9
Do not sit next to adult members of the opposite sex other than your spouse, children or parents. An arm's length away is OK, but in a crowded room women often end up on one side and men on the other to avoid the empty buffer chairs that result when the puzzle becomes too complex.

Step 10
Don't kiss, hug, or make similar displays of affection toward your spouse in front of anyone.

Step 11
Don't eat in public. This is to prevent the rudeness of eating in front of someone who may be hungry.

Step 12
Wash your hands before and after you eat. Dining rooms, in larger restaurants and homes generally have a sink for this purpose.

Step 13
Eat with your right hand only. You can touch dishes and drinking cups with your left hand, but food only touches the right.

Step 14
Try not to make chewing noises while eating.

Step 15
If served food on a banana leaf, fold it toward you after you're done to indicate that you liked the food. If you fold it away from you it means you didn't like the food.

Step 16
After eating get up and wash your hand with water. While you do put your fingers in your mouth while eating, it's not polite to lick your fingers clean. In most places napkins won't be available, or won't be adequate for how dirty your hand gets.

Step 17
Avoid stepping on, or touching paper, especially printed paper, with your feet. This can be interpreted as an insult to knowledge, and the goddess Saraswati.

Step 18
If people are sitting on the floor, sit on a mat, not on the floor it's self unless no mats are available.

Step 19
Don't enter a kitchen unless you are invited.

Step 20
When speaking English, avoid saying please and thank you. In many Indian languages the closest equivalent words are only used when desperately begging or expressing gratitude for an enormous favor, so please and thank you sound strange and excessively formal in English. There are other ways to speak politely. Complements on food and dress are generally well received.


References: http://www.ehow.com/how_5331114_polite-south-india.html
Bidita Rahman :)
Id: 092-11-956
23rd batch
Department of Business Administration
School of Business
Daffodil International University
latifa@diu.edu.bd

Offline bidita

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Re: South Indian etiquette
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2011, 05:20:07 PM »
How to Be Polite in South India

Instructions

   1.
      1

      When entering a house remove your shoes. It's OK to step on the designs on the ground outside the door , but don't step on similar designs in front of an alter. Shoes are also removed before entering temple grounds.
   2.
      2

      Step through the door with your right foot first, especially the first time you visit a home.
   3.
      3

      When handing something to someone use your right hand or both hands for larger objects. Never hand anything to someone with only your left.
   4.
      4

      When bringing a a gift to a family, give it to the female head of household if there is one, and always give it to her after your are inside the house, not through the door. The eldest woman in the visiting group usually gives the gift on behalf of the group or family.
   5.
      5

      When you enter a room, greet the elders first. When greeting elders, or when you wish to be formal bow with hands together at the chest and say, "namaste" or "namaskaram". In Tamil Nadu the equivalent of Namaste is, "vanakkam". In a less formal situation with Telugu speakers you can use "bagunara" which is like, "how are you?" in English. The response to, "bagunara", is, "bagunanu", I'm good.
   6.
      6

      When speaking to someone you've met before, ask how their family is. It's more expected to ask about each family member by name or relationship to the person you're talking to, instead of simply asking, "How's your family?", like you would in some other parts of the world.
   7.
      7

      Don't cross your legs. Crossing the legs is a reserved for the eldest man in the room. You may meet people who don't observe this etiquette, but it's most respectful not to, especially with people you don't know well.
   8.
      8

      Avoid touching adult members of the opposite sex. An exception may be made for shaking hands in some settings, but only shake hands if the woman offers her hand first, otherwise use the namaste bow greeting.
   9.
      9

      Do not sit next to adult members of the opposite sex other than your spouse, children or parents. An arm's length away is OK, but in a crowded room women often end up on one side and men on the other to avoid the empty buffer chairs that result when the puzzle becomes too complex.
  10.
      10

      Don't kiss, hug, or make similar displays of affection toward your spouse in front of anyone.
  11.
      11

      Don't eat in public. This is to prevent the rudeness of eating in front of someone who may be hungry.
  12.
      12

      Wash your hands before and after you eat. Dining rooms, in larger restaurants and homes generally have a sink for this purpose.
  13.
      13

      Eat with your right hand only. You can touch dishes and drinking cups with your left hand, but food only touches the right. Most food including rice and curry is eaten with the hand. This may take some practice first if you have never done it before. Rice and curry is held between the thumb and longer fingers. Food should not go above the second joint on your fingers.
  14.
      14

      Try not to make chewing noises while eating.
  15.
      15

      If served food on a banana leaf, fold it toward you after you're done to indicate that you liked the food. If you fold it away from you it means you didn't like the food.
  16.
      16

      After eating get up and wash your hand with water. While you do put your fingers in your mouth while eating, it's not polite to lick your fingers clean. In most places napkins won't be available, or won't be adequate for how dirty your hand gets.
  17.
      17

      Avoid stepping on, or touching paper, especially printed paper, with your feet. This can be interpreted as an insult to knowledge, and the goddess Saraswati.
  18.
      18

      If people are sitting on the floor, sit on a mat, not on the floor it's self unless no mats are available.
  19.
      19

      Don't enter a kitchen unless you are invited.
  20.
      20

      When speaking English, avoid saying please and thank you. In many Indian languages the closest equivalent words are only used when desperately begging or expressing gratitude for an enormous favor, so please and thank you sound strange and excessively formal in English. There are other ways to speak politely. Complements on food and dress are generally well received.
Bidita Rahman :)
Id: 092-11-956
23rd batch
Department of Business Administration
School of Business
Daffodil International University
latifa@diu.edu.bd